drawback


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draw·back

 (drô′băk′)
n.
1. A disadvantage or inconvenience. See Synonyms at disadvantage.
2. A refund or remittance, such as a discount on duties or taxes for goods destined for reexport.

drawback

(ˈdrɔːˌbæk)
n
1. a disadvantage or hindrance
2. (Commerce) a refund of customs or excise duty paid on goods that are being exported or used in the production of manufactured exports
vb
3. to retreat; move backwards
4. to turn aside from an undertaking

draw•back

(ˈdrɔˌbæk)

n.
1. an undesirable or objectionable feature; disadvantage.
2. a refund of tariff or other tax, as when imported goods are exported anew.
[1690–1700]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.drawback - the quality of being a hindrance; "he pointed out all the drawbacks to my plan"
disadvantage - the quality of having an inferior or less favorable position
catch, gimmick - a drawback or difficulty that is not readily evident; "it sounds good but what's the catch?"

drawback

drawback

noun
An unfavorable condition, circumstance, or characteristic:
Translations
خَلَلسَيِّئَه، نَقْص
nedostateknevýhoda
ulempeminus
haitta
nedostatak
galli, ókostur
欠点
단점
nackdel
ข้อเสียเปรียบ
mặt hạn chế

drawback

[ˈdrɔːbæk] Ninconveniente m, desventaja f

drawback

[ˈdrɔːbæk] ninconvénient m

drawback

nNachteil m

drawback

[ˈdrɔːˌbæk] ninconveniente m, svantaggio

draw

(droː) past tense drew (druː) : past participle drawn verb
1. to make a picture or pictures (of), usually with a pencil, crayons etc. During his stay in hospital he drew a great deal; Shall I draw a cow?
2. to pull along, out or towards oneself. She drew the child towards her; He drew a gun suddenly and fired; All water had to be drawn from a well; The cart was drawn by a pony.
3. to move (towards or away from someone or something). The car drew away from the kerb; Christmas is drawing closer.
4. to play (a game) in which neither side wins. The match was drawn / We drew at 1–1.
5. to obtain (money) from a fund, bank etc. to draw a pension / an allowance.
6. to open or close (curtains).
7. to attract. She was trying to draw my attention to something.
noun
1. a drawn game. The match ended in a draw.
2. an attraction. The acrobats' act should be a real draw.
3. the selecting of winning tickets in a raffle, lottery etc. a prize draw.
4. an act of drawing, especially a gun. He's quick on the draw.
ˈdrawing noun
(the art of making) a picture made with a pencil, crayon etc. the drawings of Leonardo da Vinci; I am no good at drawing.
drawn adjective
1. (of curtains) pulled together or closed. The curtains were drawn, although it was still daylight.
2. (of a game etc) neither won nor lost. a drawn match.
3. (of a blade etc) pulled out of its sheath. a drawn sword.
4. (of a person) strained and tired. His face was pale and drawn.
ˈdrawback noun
a disadvantage. There are several drawbacks to his plan.
ˈdrawbridge noun
a bridge (at the entrance to a castle) which can be pulled up or let down.
ˈdrawing-pin noun
(American ˈthumbtack) a pin with a broad, flat head used for fastening paper to a board etc.
ˈdrawstring noun
a cord threaded through the top of a bag etc for closing it.
draw a blank
to be unsuccessful in a search, inquiry etc.
draw a conclusion from
to come to a conclusion after thinking about (what one has learned). Don't draw any hasty conclusions from what I've said!
draw in
(of a car etc) to come to a halt at the side of the road.
draw the line
to fix a limit especially for what one is prepared to do.
draw/cast lots
to decide who is to do etc something by drawing names out of a box etc. Five of us drew lots for the two pop-concert tickets.
draw off
to pour out (liquid) from a large container. The barman drew off a pint of beer.
draw on
to use (money, strength, memory etc) as a source. I'll have to draw on my savings.
draw on
1. to pull on. He drew on his gloves.
2. to come nearer. Night drew on.
draw out
1. to take (money) from a bank. I drew out $40 yesterday.
2. to make longer. We drew out the journey as much as we could but we still arrived early.
3. (of a car etc) to move into the middle of the road from the side.
draw up
1. (of a car etc) to stop. We drew up outside their house.
2. to arrange in an acceptable form or order. They drew up the soldiers in line; The solicitor drew up a contract for them to sign.
3. to move closer. Draw up a chair!
4. to extend (oneself) into an upright position. He drew himself up to his full height.
long drawn out
going on for a long time. The meeting was long drawn out; a long-drawn-out meeting/scream.

drawback

خَلَل nevýhoda ulempe Nachteil μειονέκτημα inconveniente haitta inconvénient nedostatak svantaggio 欠点 단점 nadeel ulempe wada desvantagem недостаток nackdel ข้อเสียเปรียบ engel mặt hạn chế 缺点
References in classic literature ?
The only drawback I experience is when Americans sometimes express surprise that I should be travelling round alone; so you see it doesn't come from Europeans.
In the elegant and improving companionship which I now enjoy I should feel quite happy but for one drawback.
With this one little drawback (if it is a drawback), there is nothing infirm or old or awkward about him; his slight limp when he walks has (perhaps to my partial eyes) a certain quaint grace of its own, which is pleasanter to see than the unrestrained activity of other men.
To be sure there was one rather unpleasant drawback to these agreeable anticipations--the possibility of falling in with a foraging party of these same bloody-minded Typees, whose appetites, edged perhaps by the air of so elevated a region, might prompt them to devour one.
She was unquestionably a handsome person--with the one serious drawback of her ghastly complexion, and with the less noticeable defect of a total want of tenderness in the expression of her eyes.
At the same time, and barring that slight drawback, I am bound to testify that he was the perfect model of a client.
The usual drawback to success is that it annoys one's friends so; but in Annette's case this drawback was absent.
She gave the history of her recent visit, and now her raptures might well be over; for Edmund was so struck with the circumstance, so delighted with what Miss Crawford had done, so gratified by such a coincidence of conduct between them, that Fanny could not but admit the superior power of one pleasure over his own mind, though it might have its drawback.
It was easy to decide that she was still too young; and Jane remained with them, sharing, as another daughter, in all the rational pleasures of an elegant society, and a judicious mixture of home and amusement, with only the drawback of the future, the sobering suggestions of her own good understanding to remind her that all this might soon be over.
Stryver, a man of little more than thirty, but looking twenty years older than he was, stout, loud, red, bluff, and free from any drawback of delicacy, had a pushing way of shouldering himself (morally and physically) into companies and conversations, that argued well for his shouldering his way up in life.
But before going further, it is important to mention here, that though the harpoon may be pitchpoled in the same way with the lance, yet it is seldom done; and when done, is still less frequently successful, on account of the greater weight and inferior length of the harpoon as compared with the lance, which in effect become serious drawbacks.
it is one of the many drawbacks of experience that it frequently prevents our behaving with spirit.