References in classic literature ?
"You will do as the majority decide, or you will be `the first' without the formality of drawing lots," said Monsieur Thuran threateningly.
"I am glad you think I have been useful to her; but Harriet only wanted drawing out, and receiving a few, very few hints.
After having failed in poetry, Monsieur de Beaufort tried drawing. He drew portraits, with a piece of coal, of the cardinal; and as his talents did not enable him to produce a very good likeness, he wrote under the picture that there might be little doubt regarding the original: "Portrait of the Illustrious Coxcomb, Mazarin." Monsieur de Chavigny, the governor of Vincennes, waited upon the duke to request that he would amuse himself in some other way, or that at all events, if he drew likenesses, he would not put mottoes underneath them.
"When you have done with that drawing," he said quietly, "please let me have it back again."
"D'you think it's good?" she asked, nodding at her drawing.
"Straight flush of four, open at both ends--a good drawing hand."
The man upstairs waited a short time, but as his wife did not come back and his thirst grew ever greater, he said: 'I must go into the cellar myself and see where Elsie is.' But when he got into the cellar, and they were all sitting together crying, and he heard the reason, and that Elsie's child was the cause, and the Elsie might perhaps bring one into the world some day, and that he might be killed by the pick-axe, if he should happen to be sitting beneath it, drawing beer just at the very time when it fell down, he cried: 'Oh, what a clever Elsie!' and sat down, and likewise wept with them.
This was the drawing which had suggested my question--an idle question enough--but how could I begin to talk of business to her the moment I opened my lips?
"What a pity it is, Elinor," said Marianne, "that Edward should have no taste for drawing."
The duel already had been long contested and the day was drawing to a close.
The meeting of the next day at Muswell Hill had for its object-- as Turlington had already been informed--the drawing of Natalie's marriage-settlement.
The Dormouse had closed its eyes by this time, and was going off into a doze; but, on being pinched by the Hatter, it woke up again with a little shriek, and went on: `--that begins with an M, such as mouse-traps, and the moon, and memory, and muchness-- you know you say things are "much of a muchness"--did you ever see such a thing as a drawing of a muchness?'