dreads


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dreads

 (drĕdz)
pl.n. Informal
Dreadlocks.
References in classic literature ?
She regrets leaving the tranquil retirement of this remote sea-side place--she dreads change.
She turned from the window with gladness in her eyes, for the wife's chief dread was stilled.
It is not what you suppose, Mary, nor WHOM you suppose," answered my mistress; "I mean Mademoiselle Hennequin--I confess I DO dread the glance of her reproving eye.
All the force of her nature had been concentrated on the one effort of concealment, and she had shrunk with irresistible dread from every course that could tend towards a betrayal of her miserable secret.
In addition to the pain of separation, there was the horrid dread of falling into the hands of Master Andrew.
There was really, even now, no tangible evidence to the contrary; but since the previous night a vague dread had hung on his sky-line.
God willed, no doubt, to open to this elect the treasures of eternal beatitude, at this hour when other men tremble with the idea of being severely received by the Lord, and cling to this life they know, in the dread of the other life of which they get but merest glimpses by the dismal murky torch of death.
At such times, although I longed to destroy it with a blow, I was yet withheld from so doing, partly by a memory of my former crime, but chiefly - let me confess it at once - by absolute dread of the beast.
He felt too restless to sleep, and he had a horrible dread of being moved on by the police.
Dread is she, and with Ares she loves deeds of war, the sack of cities and the shouting and the battle.
Next CHEMOS, th' obscene dread of MOABS Sons, From AROER to NEBO, and the wild Of Southmost ABARIM; in HESEBON And HERONAIM, SEONS Realm, beyond The flowry Dale of SIBMA clad with Vines, And ELEALE to th' ASPHALTICK Pool.
Thou dost mark well, faithful and trusty squire, the gloom of this night, its strange silence, the dull confused murmur of those trees, the awful sound of that water in quest of which we came, that seems as though it were precipitating and dashing itself down from the lofty mountains of the Moon, and that incessant hammering that wounds and pains our ears; which things all together and each of itself are enough to instil fear, dread, and dismay into the breast of Mars himself, much more into one not used to hazards and adventures of the kind.