dream catcher


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dream catcher

dream catcher

or dream·catch·er  (drēm′kăch′ər, -kĕch′-)
n.
A handicraft item consisting of a circular frame strung with loose webbing worked into a pattern around a central hole and often decorated with feathers and beads, used in certain Native American traditions as a charm to separate good forces or influences from bad ones.

dream catcher

- A decorative Native American object in the form of a hoop and net with attachments such as feathers.
See also related terms for net.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Boulder-based Quintess and Dream Catcher Retreats, of Greenwood Village, two luxury destination clubs, will merge and become Quintess, Catch the Dream, which will be located in Boulder.
The Dream catcher now comes in all sizes and a great variety of designs, depending on the artist making them and how they were taught.
And a few older projects are finally resulting in releases: the shrub breeding program just named two new lilacs, 'Old Glory' and 'Declaration,' and two new flowering cherries, 'First Lady' and 'Dream Catcher.'
"We wanted it to be different from some other feminist bookstores," says Lui, "where when you walk in, there's all white women working there, Naomi Wolfe and Gloria Steinem on the posters and maybe a scary dream catcher or something."
The dancer's hands usually begin at her side, clutching a dream catcher (also of Ojibway origin) and a feathered fan.
To celebrate 100 years of rail service, the Crown-owned rail-way is introducing its Dream Catcher Express in late September for a nine-day run.
To Native Americans, the dream catcher represents a cherished piece of tribal mythology.
Cat Claws also gives to Dream Catcher Outdoor Adventures Inc.
A Dream Catcher Prods./Tarinatalo-Storyhouse Finland production in association with YLE, Arte, TV4 Sweden, Danmarks Radio.
"He was having bad dreams, so he made a dream catcher, and he stopped having bad dreams."
The first thing Chris Kirk did after she left an 18-year tenure at Arthur Andersen was to get a tattoo on her foot--the figure of a Native American symbol known as "Dream Catcher." That artifact, traditionally hung on a bedpost, is said to deliver up good dreams to the Great Spirit while incinerating bad ones.
Three keynote speakers will converge in Albuquerque next month where, in the spirit of the Lakota legend of the dream catcher, they will spin a web of insight into the future of the camp experience.