drey

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drey

(dreɪ) or

dray

n
(Biology) a squirrel's nest
[C17: of unknown origin]

drey

- A squirrel's nest of twigs in a tree.
See also related terms for twigs.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.drey - the nest of a squirrel
nest - a structure in which animals lay eggs or give birth to their young
References in periodicals archive ?
Red squirrel kits have also started leaving their dreys and are also likely to run on to the roads.
I condemn the killing of Doctor Drey and all the other Dreys.
Some squirrels live in trees, where they build dreys, a football-sized nest lined with grass and bark.
Their large dreys (nests) will |be visible along with chewed pine cones scattered around the forest.
They're called "dreys," and they're the nests of tree squirrels.
volans nest in large, dying and dead trees with natural cavities or cavities made by woodpeckers (Picidae); however, external leaf-nests built on branches, called dreys, also have been reported (e.g., Dolan and Carter, 1977; Wells-Gossling, 1985; Bendel and Gates, 1987; Taulman, 1999; Holloway and Malcolm, 2007), especially in areas with low availability of snags and cavities (Carey et al., 1997), and at lower latitudes (Weigl, 1978; Holloway and Malcolm, 2007).
Their large dreys (nests) will be visible along with chewed pine cones.
This includes the indiscriminate killing of lactating females, which will mean their kittens will starve to death in their dreys. And it is being called "humane".
Both red and greys are active by day, and sleep by night in their nests - called dreys.
This will include the killing of lactating females, which means their kittens will starve to death in their dreys - and it is being called "humane".
Nicolau Dreys residiu por dez anos na provincia e publicou durante o transcurso da Revolucao Farroupilha as suas Noticias descritivas, que tem sido igualmente muito discutida.
The two squirrel species share nests - called dreys - and researchers have found evidence that infected parasites left by greys pass the disease by biting reds.