drip line


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drip line

The point where the canopy of a tree or shrub sheds water, forming a wet ring around the plant after rain.
References in periodicals archive ?
The length of the drip line must also be considered when laying out the lines.
If the tree is small, mulch out to the drip line of your tree.
It also allows them to calculate the amount of water used by the drip line, so they can know the specific amount of time required to open up the tank or pump.
To determine how the root damage might affect the health of the tree, a professional arborist can estimate how much of the rooting area was affected within the critical root zone (CRZ), a circular area around the stem of the tree, usually smaller than the area defined by the outer reaches of the tree's branches, known as the drip line. If any of the main roots inside the CRZ are damaged or missing, the risk of tree failure is greatly increased.
Remarkable increases in soil respiration rates occurred within the horizontal 20-cm-distance from the drip line. Compared with the perpendicular direction to the drip line, more plant roots developed in the parallel direction, and their spatial distribution appeared in the range of 40-cm-width and 60-cm-depth beneath the drip line.
Use a soil probe to check the moisture level around the drip line. If conditions are dry several inches deep, apply water slowly.
Also, metal accumulation in drip line soil and plant tissue were analyzed for silver (Ag), aluminum (Al), arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), manganese (Mn), lead (Pb), selenium (Se), and zinc (Zn).
Its products include integrated drip line solutions, flat and round drippers, blank tubes and other irrigation products.
I developed an inexpensive and easy way to protect the young seedling transplants until they are large enough to prevent predation, using transparent plastic cups and metal stays from the drip line. Large packages of transparent plastic drinking cups are available at your favorite discount retail store.
The edge of the canopy is known as the tree's "drip line." This means that any "rain" or moisture that falls on the tree will be absorbed by the tree's feeder root system at the drip line.
Shrubs under the drip line of the house eves, melting snow from building roofs will refreeze and could break branches of the plants.
In general, a good location for a tensiometer is at the drip line on the tree side of the first furrow, south or west of the tree.'