droopy

(redirected from droopier)
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droop

 (dro͞op)
v. drooped, droop·ing, droops
v.intr.
1. To bend or hang downward: "His mouth drooped sadly, pulled down, no doubt, by the plump weight of his jowls" (Gore Vidal).
2. To bend or sag gradually: flowers drooping in the midday heat.
3. To sag in dejection or exhaustion: drooped from lack of sleep.
v.tr.
To let bend or hang down: "He drooped his body over the rail" (Norman Mailer).
n.
The act or condition of drooping.

[Middle English droupen, from Old Norse drūpa; see dhreu- in Indo-European roots.]

droop′i·ly, droop′ing·ly adv.
droop′y adj.

droopy

(ˈdruːpɪ)
adj
hanging or sagging downwards: a droopy moustache.
ˈdroopily adv
ˈdroopiness n

droop•y

(ˈdru pi)

adj. droop•i•er, droop•i•est.
1. hanging down; sagging.
2. disheartened; dejected.
[1200–50]
droop′i•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.droopy - hanging down (as from exhaustion or weakness)
lax - lacking in strength or firmness or resilience; "a lax rope"; "a limp handshake"

droopy

adjective sagging, limp, wilting, stooped, floppy, drooping, languid, flabby, languorous, pendulous, lassitudinous a droopy moustache
Translations

droopy

[ˈdruːpɪ] ADJ (droopier (compar) (droopiest (superl)))
1. [moustache, tail, breasts] → colgón
2. (hum) (= tired) → mustio

droopy

[ˈdruːpi] adj [moustache] → tombant(e)

droopy

adj
schlaff; tailherabhängend; moustachenach unten hängend; eyelidsherunterhängend; (with sleep) → schwer
(inf, = tired, weak) → schlaff, schlapp (inf)

droopy

[ˈdruːpɪ] adj (-ier (comp) (-iest (superl))) (moustache) → cascante
References in periodicals archive ?
Sheep do tend to have droopier, more folded ears, but not every breed follows this trend.
And, horrors--his lip could be getting droopier with age, or he may have undergone subtle anatomic changes, creating a lip-fold issue.
The raters also thought people had paler skin, paler lips, more swollen faces, redder eyes, more hanging eyelids and droopier mouths after they got the real injection than after they got the fake one.
The giveaway cues were identified to be the most physically obvious, such as having paler lips and skin, a more swollen face, droopier mouth corners and eyelids, redder eyes, and duller, patchier skin. The finding could "help medical doctors and computer software to better detect sick people," said Axelsson - a potentially valuable diagnostic tool in a disease outbreak.