druidism


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Related to druidism: Druidry

dru·id

also Dru·id  (dro͞o′ĭd)
n.
A member of an order of priests in ancient Gaul and Britain who appear in Welsh and Irish legend as prophets and sorcerers.

[From Latin druidēs, druids, of Celtic origin; see deru- in Indo-European roots.]

dru·id′ic (dro͞o-ĭd′ĭk), dru·id′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
dru·id′i·cal·ly adv.
dru′id·ism n.

druidism

(ˈdruːɪdɪzəm)
n (often capital)
1. (Other Non-Christian Religions) history the beliefs and religious system of the ancient druids
2. (Other Non-Christian Religions) the beliefs of modern-day druids

Druidism

the doctrines and practices of an order of Celtic priests in ancient Britain, Gaul, and Ireland. — Druid, n., adj.Druidic, Druidical, adj.
See also: Religion
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.druidism - the system of religion and philosophy taught by the Druids and their rites and ceremonies
heathenism, pagan religion, paganism - any of various religions other than Christianity or Judaism or Islamism
Translations
References in classic literature ?
We don't believe in Egyptian mythology, but the Egyptians did; and I suppose even the Druids believed in Druidism. But the eighteenth-century gentleman who built these temples didn't believe in Venus or Mercury any more than we do; that's why the reflection of those pale pillars in the lake is truly only the shadow of a shade.
In the pages of "Modern Druidism" Byghan provides an informed and informative introduction to modern Druidism, as well as providing a comprehensive overview of today's Pagan religion and philosophy, whose roots are in the Celtic tribal societies of ancient Britain and Ireland.
He traveled the world, as far as India, learning the tenets of Buddhism, Druidism, and Theosophy.
II Another 423 people in the West Midlands stated their religion as "druid" or druidism.
In this talk we will explore the archaeology at Stonehenge during the time when British Druidism was at its peak and seek to answer this question once and for all!
"The religion of the time" in the sixth century, Peacock declares, "was Christianity grafted on Druidism" (Misfortunes, 42).
To oversimplify the history of these societies--each housing different traditions or "Obediences" and each having some deeper historical roots (with most of them actually claiming to go back to the Egyptian golden dawn)--one could say that the historical legacy framing Newton's epoch runs like this: Alchemy / Hermeticism / Rosicrucianism / Freemasonry / Druidism.
Synopsis: "Celtic Mythology: The Nature and Influence of Celtic Myth from Druidism to Arthurian Legend" by Ward Rutherford is a lively and absorbing account of the world of Celtic myth and the role it has played in the development of western culture.
Historical Druidism as well as Germanic paganism appear to have involved cultic practice in sacred groves, especially the oak.[2] The term druid itself possibly derives from the Celtic word for oak.
I will then discuss the revival of Druidry (also known as Druidism) within the context of Neopagan earth worship, and provide an overview of ADF Druid beliefs and practices, including their ritual structure.
In fact, Allan Kardec thought of his Spiritism--an amalgam of secular (anti-clerical) Christianity, Druidism, spirit communication, "scientific" evolution, and the vogue (beginning in 1830s France) for Eastern ideas such as metempsychosis (reincarnation)--as a unifying system that could bring all religions into one (Sharp 2006: 175).
Another 423 people in the West Midlands stated their religion as "druid" or druidism. And there are 156 practising Scientologists in the region.