dry law


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dry law

n
(Law) chiefly US a law prohibiting the sale of alcoholic beverages
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
According to the dry law in Israel that has been on the books for some two years, Omar whose legislation implicitly calls for the boycott of Israel could be denied entry.
The Scalcucci brothers had bought a railcar load of grapes and made their wine before the January deadline, and the dry law allowed them to store it in their home for personal use.
Alaskans now had two separate statutes criminalizing their possession of alcohol: Alaska's 1917 Bone Dry law and the 1919 national Volstead Act.
To its part, Adalah center, commenting on the decision, said that "the Supreme Court was coveting behind the dry law, which gives Israel the "right" to lay hands on the land, and completely ignore the humanitarian, political, social and historical dimensions of the cause and the lives of its people.
The measures included the "dry law" prohibiting the purchase, sale and consumption of alcohol, to stop people getting rubbered and starting battles.
"GODless Environmentalism" takes a dry law, science, and ethical topic and gives it the full depth of faith and beauty that Planet Earth deserves.
Part of the reason for slower sales growth in Brazil is a tough new "dry law" that punishes drivers caught with any detectable trace of alcohol in their blood.
They seized thousands of copies of the Jinky movie Lord of the Wing and hit single Dirty Old Town in a house in the Dry law district they believed was being used to store smuggled cigarettes.
The changes to the dry law, in effect for almost a century, will be applicable to the presidential and congressional elections on July 2, 2006.
It's not that there's going to be a dry law, [just that] those who want to buy will pay a lot."
16 edition of the New York Times featured two stories about the new legislation, with the fi.rst one relaying what was to take place on the first day of the "Dry Law."
In 1921, for example, deputy Briones Luco wrote to request information about the company's dry law and new industrial policies and was informed by Braden of social welfare's many advantages: increased savings by workers, involvement in social works and patriotic activities, better appearance, the elimination of criminality, more "robust" and stable families based on the foundation of civil marriage, participation in social clubs and sports teams, and attendance at vocational schools.