dryad


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dry·ad

 (drī′əd, -ăd′)
n. Greek Mythology
A divinity presiding over forests and trees; a wood nymph.

[Middle English Driad, from Latin Dryas, Dryad-, from Greek Druas, from drūs, tree; see deru- in Indo-European roots.]

dry·ad′ic (-ăd′ĭk) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

dryad

(ˈdraɪəd; -æd)
n, pl -ads or -ades (-əˌdiːz)
(Classical Myth & Legend) Greek myth a nymph or divinity of the woods
[C14: from Latin Dryas, from Greek Druas, from drus tree]
dryadic adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

dry•ad

(ˈdraɪ əd, -æd)

n., pl. -ads, -a•des (-əˌdiz)
(often cap.)
a nymph of the woods.
[1545–55; < Greek Dryádes, pl. of Dryás, derivative of drŷ(s) tree, oak]
dry•ad′ic, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

dryad

a wood nymph.
See also: Mythology
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dryad - a deity or nymph of the woods
nymph - (classical mythology) a minor nature goddess usually depicted as a beautiful maiden; "the ancient Greeks believed that nymphs inhabited forests and bodies of water"
hamadryad - the nymph or spirit of a particular tree
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

dryad

nDryade f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
We have agreed to call the spring down by the log bridge the Dryad's Bubble.
"It seems to me that the little girls Diana and I used to be play here still, and sit by the Dryad's Bubble in the twilights, trysting with the ghosts.
the tree at whose foot I lay had opened its rocky side, and in the cleft, like a long lily-bud sliding from its green sheath, stood a dryad, and my speech failed and my breath went as I looked upon her beauty, for which mortality has no simile.
"The Greeks and Romans," said the old man, "called her a Dryad; but that we do not understand.
With these she decorated her hair and her young waist, and became a nymph child, or an infant dryad, or whatever else was in closest sympathy with the antique wood.
"Heaps of them, oh, dryad! There is a big grove of fir trees behind it, two rows of Lombardy poplars down the lane, and a ring of white birches around a very delightful garden.
Thus saying, from her Husbands hand her hand Soft she withdrew, and like a Wood-Nymph light OREAD or DRYAD, or of DELIA's Traine, Betook her to the Groves, but DELIA's self In gate surpass'd and Goddess-like deport, Though not as shee with Bow and Quiver armd, But with such Gardning Tools as Are yet rude, Guiltless of fire had formd, or Angels brought, To PALES, or POMONA, thus adornd, Likest she seemd, POMONA when she fled VERTUMNUS, or to CERES in her Prime, Yet Virgin of PROSERPINA from JOVE.
Why, it's a time and place when and where everything might come true--when the men in green might creep out to join hands and dance around the fire, or dryads steal from their trees to warm their white limbs, grown chilly in October frosts, by the blaze.
But the drivers, through miles of dark squalid road, poured out their souls to the dryads and the saints, and Lucy poured out hers to her cousin.
(8) Nymphs of the ash-trees, as Dryads are nymphs of the oak- trees.
He stared; and little by little he made out the great apartment, with a domed ceiling from which the light poured, and walls that were one enormous painting--nymphs and dryads dancing in a flower-strewn glade--Diana with her hounds and horses, dashing headlong through a mountain streamlet--a group of maidens bathing in a forest pool--all life-size, and so real that Jurgis thought that it was some work of enchantment, that he was in a dream palace.
Oh, ye wood nymphs and dryads, that dwell in the thickets of the forest, so may the nimble wanton satyrs by whom ye are vainly wooed never disturb your sweet repose, help me to lament my hard fate or at least weary not at listening to it!