duckling


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duck·ling

 (dŭk′lĭng)
n.
A young duck.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

duckling

(ˈdʌklɪŋ)
n
(Zoology) a young duck
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

duck•ling

(ˈdʌk lɪŋ)

n.
a young duck.
[1400–50]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.duckling - flesh of a young domestic duckduckling - flesh of a young domestic duck  
duck - flesh of a duck (domestic or wild)
2.duckling - young duck
duck - small wild or domesticated web-footed broad-billed swimming bird usually having a depressed body and short legs
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
فَرْخ بَط
káčátkokachňátko
ælling
kiskacsa
andarungi
ančiukas
kaczątko
kačiatko
račka
ördek yavrusu

duckling

[ˈdʌklɪŋ] Npatito m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

duckling

[ˈdʌklɪŋ] ncaneton mduck pond nmare f aux canards
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

duckling

nEntenküken, Entlein nt; roast ducklinggebratene junge Ente ? ugly duckling
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

duckling

[ˈdʌklɪŋ] nanatroccolo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

duck2

(dak) plurals ducks ~duck noun
1. a kind of wild or domesticated water-bird with short legs and a broad flat beak.
2. a female duck. See also drake.
3. in cricket, a score of nil by a batsman. He was out for a duck.
ˈduckling (-liŋ) noun
a baby duck.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
Aurelia could have understood the feeling of a narrow-minded and conventional hen who has brought a strange, intrepid duckling into the world; but her situation was still more wonderful, for she could only compare her sensations to those of some quiet brown Dorking who has brooded an ordinary egg and hatched a bird of paradise.
The ugly duckling turned out a swan, you know." And Amy smiled without bitterness, for she possessed a happy temper and hopeful spirit.
Men of one idea, like a hen with one chicken, and that a duckling; men of a thousand ideas, and unkempt heads, like those hens which are made to take charge of a hundred chickens, all in pursuit of one bug, a score of them lost in every morning's dew -- and become frizzled and mangy in consequence; men of ideas instead of legs, a sort of intellectual centipede that made you crawl all over.
In the meantime, outside the palace walls, the poor White Duck swam up and down the pond; and near it laid three eggs, out of which there came one morning two little fluffy ducklings and a little ugly drake.
In the meantime the two little ducklings had fallen asleep, and the little drake lay between them, covered up by their wings, to be kept warm under their feathers.
WHAT a funny sight it is to see a brood of ducklings with a hen!
He said he loved eggs and ducklings; he should be proud to see a fine nestful in his wood-shed.
Here and there a cygnet is reared uneasily among the ducklings in the brown pond, and never finds the living stream in fellowship with its own oary-footed kind.
There was watercress soup, and sole, and a delightful omelette stuffed with mushrooms and truffles, and two small rare ducklings, and artichokes, and a dry yellow Rhone wine of which Bartley had always been very fond.
Further out still lay a great merchant-ship, high ended, deep waisted, painted of a canary yellow, and towering above the fishing-boats like a swan among ducklings.
Bynoe shot some very young ducklings as specimens, declared in the most solemn manner, "Oh, Mr.
The schooners rocked and dipped at a safe distance, like mother ducks watching their brood, while the dories behaved like mannerless ducklings.