due process


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Related to due process: Bill of Rights

due process

n.
An established course for judicial proceedings or other governmental activities designed to safeguard the legal rights of the individual.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.due process - (law) the administration of justice according to established rules and principles; based on the principle that a person cannot be deprived of life or liberty or property without appropriate legal procedures and safeguards
group action - action taken by a group of people
legal proceeding, proceeding, proceedings - (law) the institution of a sequence of steps by which legal judgments are invoked
notification, presentment - an accusation of crime made by a grand jury on its own initiative
judicial decision, judgment, judgement - (law) the determination by a court of competent jurisdiction on matters submitted to it
dispossession, legal ouster, eviction - the expulsion of someone (such as a tenant) from the possession of land by process of law
plea - an answer indicating why a suit should be dismissed
demurrer, denial, defence, defense - a defendant's answer or plea denying the truth of the charges against him; "he gave evidence for the defense"
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"

due process

noun
The state, action, or principle of treating all persons equally in accordance with the law:
Translations

due process

n (Jur)
due process (of law) (US) → ordentliches Gerichtsverfahren
due process of lawordnungsgemäßes Verfahren
References in classic literature ?
No person shall be held to answer for a capital, or otherwise infamous crime, unless on a presentment or indictment of a Grand Jury, except in cases arising in the land or naval forces, or in the Militia, when in actual service in time of War or public danger; nor shall any person be subject for the same offense to be twice put in jeopardy of life or limb; nor shall be compelled in any criminal case to be a witness against himself, nor be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor shall private property be taken for public use without just compensation.
Like all his kind and all other bullies, von Schoenvorts was a coward at heart, and so he dropped his hand to his side and started to turn away; but I pulled him back, and there before his men I told him that such a thing must never again occur--that no man was to be struck or otherwise punished other than in due process of the laws that we had made and the court that we had established.
Kung nasa korte ka na (and you say you were) not given by the President, due process.
4) These days, the most damning charge against substantive due process is not that it gets the history wrong or that it unduly empowers judges, both of which might be accurate, but rather that it abuses the English language, which is not.
It reveals the beginning of a long history in which binding administrative adjudication has been a recurring danger and in which the due process of law has been the primary means of rejecting such adjudication.
The article first examines the lively debate among scholars and special interest groups about perceived deficiencies of IDEA due process and various proposals to remedy those deficiencies.
the Court explained when announcing the modern approach to procedural due process in Mathews v.
The due process protection of life, Field began, means more than "mere animal existence.
Different standards: States may assert that an employer is subject to a withholding requirement merely by establishing a minimum connection in the taxing state under a Due Process Clause standard.
Hahn's campaign manager, Bill Carrick, defended the use of the incident as an example of Villaraigosa being disingenuous when it came to an issue such as due process.
An important legal issue with significant implications for both school administrators and students is whether students have due process rights associated with disciplinary and academic hearings.
Is there no opportunity for a court, in your view, to say that this violates, for an American citizen, the elementary due process that the Constitution requires?