duellist


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duelist, duellist

1. a person engaged in a duel.
2. a person skilled at dueling.
See also: Conflict
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.duellist - a person who fights duels
adversary, antagonist, opposer, resister, opponent - someone who offers opposition
Translations

duellist

duelist (US) [ˈdjʊəlɪst] Nduelista m

duellist

, (US) duelist
nDuellant m
References in classic literature ?
Some seven minutes later the island was occupied by an invasion of townsfolk and police, and the latter had put their hands on the victorious duellist, ritually reminding him that anything he said might be used against him.
Away on the farthest cape or headland of the long islet, on a strip of turf beyond the last rank of roses, the duellists had already crossed swords.
He was also younger brother of Lord Edward Herbert of Cherbury, an inveterate duellist and the father of English Deism.
Battius, swelling with secret distrust, and clearing his throat, before speaking, much in the manner that a duellist examines the point of the weapon he is about to plunge into the body of his foe.
The French ask for a duellist as the English ask for a sportsman.
They were listening for the whistle agreed upon, when suddenly savage cries resounded in the air, accompanied by reports which certainly did not issue from the car where the duellists were.
It was not because a tournament was a great matter, it was not because Sir Sagramor had found the Holy Grail, for he had not, but had failed; it was not because the second (official) personage in the king- dom was one of the duellists; no, all these features were commonplace.
Robin Paterson from the Elgin Duellist and Fencing Club said: "The general health benefits for older people of staying physically active, for both mind and body, are now widely known.
Among the portraits of female sitters was the famous classicising group fantasy of Three Ladies Adorning a Term of Hymen (1773); the male portraits included a spectacularly camp performance by the duellist and womaniser Charles Coote, Earl of Bellamont, dressed as a Knight of the Bath (1773-74).
If one duellist killed another, then all involved in that duel were charged with murder.
Inlaid work by the Milanese swordsmiths Marciliano and Piccinino is very fine, making the knuckle guards and straight crosses of a first class rapier made for the Elector Christian 11 of Saxony in 1609, areas of workmanship you admire and return to time and again, since they are, in their way, equivalent to the reliquary caskets and state crowns of the period, thus you tend to forget that this beautiful thing is a deadly weapon which, in the hands of a master duellist, could kill or seriously maim an opponent.