dues


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Related to dues: deus ex machina

due

 (do͞o, dyo͞o)
adj.
1. Payable immediately or on demand.
2. Owed as a debt; owing: the amount still due.
3. In accord with right, convention, or courtesy; appropriate: due esteem; all due respect.
4. Meeting special requirements; sufficient: We have due cause to honor them.
5.
a. Expected or scheduled, especially appointed to arrive: Their plane is due in 15 minutes.
b. Expected to give birth.
6.
a. Anticipated; looked for: a long due promotion.
b. Expecting or ready for something as part of a normal course or sequence: We're due for some rain. This batter is due for another hit.
c. Entitled to: I always give people the respect that they are due.
7. Capable of being attributed. See Usage Note at due to.
n.
1. Something owed or deserved: You finally received your due.
2. dues A charge or fee for membership, as in a club or organization.
adv.
1. Straight; directly: Go due west.
2. Archaic Duly.

[Middle English, from Old French deu, past participle of devoir, to owe, from Latin dēbēre; see ghabh- in Indo-European roots.]

dues

(djuːz)
pl n
(sometimes singular) charges, as for membership of a club or organization; fees: trade-union dues.
Translations

dues

[djuːz] npl (club, union fees) → quota
harbour dues → diritti mpl di porto

dues

n., pl. deuda; obligación.
References in classic literature ?
Gentlemen, I applied that money to the purpose for which I took it; I paid it as an initiation fee and one year's dues in advance to the Treasurer of the Cashiers' Mutual Defence Association.
Bartholomew was due to Charles IX's stomach being deranged.
THE SECOND charge against the House of Representatives is, that it will be too small to possess a due knowledge of the interests of its constituents.
She was of strict integrity herself, with a delicate sense of honour; but she was as desirous of saving Sir Walter's feelings, as solicitous for the credit of the family, as aristocratic in her ideas of what was due to them, as anybody of sense and honesty could well be.
But the principal failing occurred in the sailing, And the Bellman, perplexed and distressed, Said he had hoped, at least, when the wind blew due East, That the ship would not travel due West!
2) We can collect together all the happenings, in different places, which are connected in the way that common sense regards as being due to their emanating from one object.
Credit, owing to the reports afloat, was no longer to be had; and to meet the one hundred thousand francs due on the 10th of the present month, and the one hundred thousand francs due on the 15th of the next month to M.
Of old, the rise of the Yin dynasty was due to I Chih who had served under the Hsia.
It is no grace to a judge, first to find that, which he might have heard in due time from the bar; or to show quickness of conceit, in cutting off evidence or counsel too short; or to prevent information by questions, though pertinent.
To be sure, he said, they are to receive what we owe them, and an enemy, as I take it, owes to an enemy that which is due or proper to him-- that is to say, evil.
Levin thought that the clearness of Katavasov's conception of life was due to the poverty of his nature; Katavasov thought that the disconnectedness of Levin's ideas was due to his lack of intellectual discipline; but Levin enjoyed Katavasov's clearness, and Katavasov enjoyed the abundance of Levin's untrained ideas, and they liked to meet and to discuss.
He knew, further, that the California & Altamont Trust Company has an intrinsically sound institution, but that just then it was in a precarious condition due to Klinkner's speculations with its money.