duffer


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duff·er

 (dŭf′ər)
n.
1. Informal
a. An incompetent or dull-witted person.
b. A casual or mediocre player of a sport, especially golf.
2. Slang A peddler of cheap merchandise.
3. Slang Something worthless or useless.

[Origin unknown.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

duffer

(ˈdʌfə)
n
1. informal a dull or incompetent person
2. slang something worthless
3. (Professions) dialect a peddler or hawker
4. (Mining & Quarrying) a mine that proves unproductive
5. a person who steals cattle
[C19: of uncertain origin]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

duff•er

(ˈdʌf ər)

n.
1. Informal.
a. a plodding, clumsy, incompetent person.
b. a person inept or inexperienced at a specific sport, as golf.
2. Slang.
a. anything inferior, counterfeit, or useless.
b. a peddler, esp. one who sells cheap, flashy goods.
[1835–45; perhaps Scots dial. duffar, dowfart dull, stupid person]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.duffer - an incompetent or clumsy personduffer - an incompetent or clumsy person; "as a golfer he was only a duffer"
clumsy person - a person with poor motor coordination
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

duffer

noun (Informal) clot, blunderer (Brit. informal), booby, clod, oaf, bungler, galoot (slang, chiefly U.S.), lubber, lummox (informal) He was a duffer at cricket.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations

duffer

[ˈdʌfəʳ] Nzoquete m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

duffer

[ˈdʌfər] nnullard(e) m/f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

duffer

n (Brit inf)
(esp Sch) → Blödmann m (inf); to be a duffer at football/Frencheine Niete im Fußball/in Französisch sein (inf)
(= silly old man)(alter) Trottel (inf)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

duffer

[ˈdʌfəʳ] n (fam) → schiappa
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
"Gawd," he said, "I wonner if I've been played fer a duffer."
Well, they had grand times at that reception - a small-fry noble from Hoboken told me all about it - Sir Richard Duffer, Baronet."
Duffer kept a sausage-shop and never saved a cent in his life because he used to give all his spare meat to the poor, in a quiet way.
I may even come in myself at a pinch; so you won't be the only duffer, if you are one, and I shall be very glad if you will come down and help us too.
He will be terribly upset, but, you know, the dear old duffer really loves me.
"I ain't taking no chances with any duffer with a yellow shirt."
"Come on, you duffer! Can't waste ammunition." And as he saw the bear apparently upon the verge of deciding to charge him, he encouraged the idea by backing rapidly away, knowing that an angry beast will more often charge one who moves than one who lies still.
Besides, I was anxious to take the wheel, the man in pink pyjamas showing himself a hopeless duffer at the business.
I feel an awful duffer when I am with you, Lord Illingworth.
"We'll get the duffers out of the way first, and then we'll have a jolly set afterwards."
They had brought him his supper, which was "duffers and dope"--being hunks of dry bread on a tin plate, and coffee, called "dope" because it was drugged to keep the prisoners quiet.
"You great duffers, there are no rats there to leave!