duke


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duke

 (do͞ok, dyo͞ok)
n.
1. A nobleman with the highest hereditary rank, especially a man of the highest grade of the peerage in Great Britain.
2. A sovereign prince who rules an independent duchy in some European countries.
3. Used as the title for such a nobleman.
4. dukes Slang The fists: Put up your dukes!
5. Botany A type of cherry intermediate between a sweet and a sour cherry.
intr.v. duked, duk·ing, dukes
To fight, especially with fists: duking it out.

[Middle English, from Old French duc, from Latin dux, duc-, leader, from dūcere, to lead; see deuk- in Indo-European roots. N., sense 4, short for Duke of Yorks, rhyming slang for forks, fingers.]

duke

(djuːk)
n
1. a nobleman of high rank: in the British Isles standing above the other grades of the nobility
2. the prince or ruler of a small principality or duchy
[C12: from Old French duc, from Latin dux leader]

duke

(duk, dyuk)

n.
1. (in Continental Europe) the male ruler of a duchy; the sovereign of a small state.
2. a British nobleman holding the highest hereditary title outside the royal family, ranking immediately below a prince and above a marquis.
3. a nobleman of corresponding rank in certain other countries.
4. a cultivated hybrid of the sweet and sour cherry.
5. dukes, Slang. fists or hands.
Idioms:
duke it out, to fight, esp. with the fists; do battle.
[1100–50; Middle English duke, duc, late Old English duc < Old French duc, dus, dux < Medieval Latin dux hereditary ruler of a small state, Latin: leader, commander]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.duke - a British peer of the highest rankduke - a British peer of the highest rank  
peer - a nobleman (duke or marquis or earl or viscount or baron) who is a member of the British peerage
2.duke - a nobleman (in various countries) of high rank
noble, nobleman, Lord - a titled peer of the realm
Translations
hertog
دوق
vévodavelkovévoda
hertug
duko
herttua
herceg
hertogi
dux
hercogashercogohercogystė
hercogs
duce
vojvoda
vojvoda
dük

duke

[djuːk] Nduque m

duke

[ˈdjuːk] nduc m
the Duke of Edinburgh → le duc d'Édimbourg

duke

nHerzog m

duke

[djuːk] nduca m

duke

(djuːk) noun
a nobleman of the highest rank.
ducal (ˈdjuːkəl) adjective
ˈdukedom noun
the rank or territories of a duke.
References in classic literature ?
The duke received his adversary as he would have done an intimate acquaintance, made room beside him on the same seat with himself, offered him refreshments, and spread over his knees the sable cloak that had been thrown on the front seat.
As soon as you please, therefore, your Grace," said De Wardes, who drew his sword, a movement imitated by the duke.
And disengaging his sword with a sinister clashing of the blade, the duke wounded the marquis in the breast.
The duke immediately began to carry his late antagonist towards the shore.
But these considerations never occurred to the duke and every day the cardinal received fresh accounts of him which were as unpleasant as possible to the minister.
Monsieur de Chavigny, the governor of Vincennes, waited upon the duke to request that he would amuse himself in some other way, or that at all events, if he drew likenesses, he would not put mottoes underneath them.
The duke thanked Monsieur de Chavigny for having, as he said, cleaned his drawing-paper for him; he then divided the walls of his room into compartments and dedicated each of these compartments to some incident in Mazarin's life.
The poor duke swore, fell into a rage, yelled, and declared that they wished to starve him to death as they had starved the Marechal Ornano and the Grand Prior of Vendome; but he refused to promise that he would not make any more drawings and remained without any fire in the room all the winter.
If you can spare me five minutes," the Duke suggested.
The Duke of Devenham, Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, whose wife entertained for his party, and whose immense income, derived mostly from her American relations, was always at its disposal, was a person almost as important in the councils of his country as the Prime Minister himself.
That is not exactly the point, my dear," the Duke explained.
Nothing at all," the Duke said, rising to his feet.