dukkha


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dukkha

(ˈdukə)
n
(Buddhism) (in Theravada Buddhism) the belief that all things are suffering, due to the desire to seek permanence or recognize the self when neither exist: one of the three basic characteristics of existence. Sanskrit word: duhkha Compare anata, anicca
[Pali, literally: suffering, illness]
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Private spirituality and morality alone cannot address and contain overall suffering or "dukkha" of our people.
As the twists of our self-grounding coping strategies become practiced, they form into habits which congeal into patterns which calcify into character, which, in being disconnected from being-as-such, is chronically anxious, suffering some form and degree of discontent (dukkha).
"Oh, I understand now!" exclaims the Sikh after the Buddhist carefully delineates the real meaning of dukkha, the prevalence of discontentment and suffering in life.
The First Noble Truth becomes "There is a decadent village." The Second Truth identifies the causes of this particular form of dukkha as including materialism, disunity, ethnic hatred, competition, and domination.
In short, total work necessarily causes dukkha, a Buddhist term referring to the unsatisfactory nature of a life filled with suffering.
In particular, Buddhadasa insisted that personal egoism and selfishness trap individuals in dissatisfaction and frustration (dukkha).
Instead, Siddhartha focused on identifying life's vicissitudes (Dukkha, "bumpy rides in life," commonly translated as "suffering"), clarifying forces responsible for these problems, delineating the ultimate goal, and specifying methods for achieving the goal (the "Four Noble Truths").
For Korda, a lot of dukkha, or suffering, is the result of negligent caretakers from childhood or neural imbalance between the left and right hemispheres of the brain.
Suffering (Dukkha) is the lack of satisfaction in life is an essential feature of the human experience which needs to be accepted by all.
The film's lead character is a nameless detective who lives alone in a cramped apartment after his wife died in childbirth, and now spends his off-time sitting next to his .38 Special drinking whiskey in the dark; a caricature of frustration, desperation, and sorrow and a suitable hyperbole of dukkha. (5) His most prevalent feature is his systematic logical processes and methods which he clings to obsessively.
Wilde's emphasis on suffering echoes the first noble truth of Buddhism, dukkha, translated as "suffering, anxiety." In fact, during his time at Oxford, Wilde sought out the acquaintance of Friedrich Max Muller, a philologist, "Orientalist," and man of tremendous learning who during Wilde's Oxford years was working on a translation of the Rig-Veda (an ancient collection of Sanskrit hymns).
Critique: An impressively well written martial arts action/adventure saga from beginning to end, "Dukkha: Hungry Ghosts" demonstrates author Loren W.