dumfounded


Also found in: Thesaurus.
Related to dumfounded: dumbfounded

dumb·found

also dum·found (dŭm′found′)
tr.v. dumb·found·ed, dumb·found·ing, dumb·founds also dum·found·ed or dum·found·ing or dum·founds
To fill with astonishment and perplexity; confound. See Synonyms at surprise.

ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.dumfounded - as if struck dumb with astonishment and surprise; "a circle of policement stood dumbfounded by her denial of having seen the accident"; "the flabbergasted aldermen were speechless"; "was thunderstruck by the news of his promotion"
surprised - taken unawares or suddenly and feeling wonder or astonishment; "surprised by her student's ingenuity"; "surprised that he remembered my name"; "a surprised expression"
References in classic literature ?
Holt was astonished--"dumfounded" is the word that he used in telling it--yet seems to have retained a certain intelligent curiosity.
But Raoul's stupefaction was so great that he stood there dumfounded, without a gesture, without a word.
I stared at him dumfounded. Then it occurred to me that it was exactly the thing I wanted.
He was secretly dumfounded at this sentiment when it came from his lips.
I can see him now as he stood dumfounded on the threshold of the hall; and yet, at the time, my eyes sped past him into the room beyond.
He was dumfounded; his head suddenly began to ache furiously; but he did not want them to think him unmanly.
Inspector Jacks was dumfounded. Such a state of affairs seemed to him impossible.
"The seditious papers!" repeated Cornelius, quite dumfounded at the imputation.
A stream of short stories flowed from his pen, and he branched out into the easier forms of verse - the kind he saw printed in the magazines - though he lost his head and wasted two weeks on a tragedy in blank verse, the swift rejection of which, by half a dozen magazines, dumfounded him.
He paused a moment as if dumfounded or uncertain how to answer such a speech, and then turned and walked away.
The next day it was a dog, even dirtier and more forlorn, perhaps, than was the kitten; and again Miss Polly, to her dumfounded amazement, found herself figuring as a kind protector and an angel of mercy--a role that Pollyanna so unhesitatingly thrust upon her as a matter of course, that the woman--who abhorred dogs even more than she did cats, if possible--found herself as before, powerless to remonstrate.
Poor Marija could not have been more dumfounded had the woman knocked her over the head; at first she could not believe what she heard, and then she grew furious and swore that she would come anyway, that her place belonged to her.