dunderhead


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dun·der·head

 (dŭn′dər-hĕd′)
n.
A dunce.

[Perhaps Dutch donder, thunder (from Middle Dutch doner; see (s)tenə- in Indo-European roots) + head.]

dun′der·head′ed adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

dunderhead

(ˈdʌndəˌhɛd)
n
a stupid or slow-witted person; dunce. Also called: dunderpate
[C17: probably from Dutch donder thunder + head; compare blockhead]
ˈdunderˌheaded adj
ˈdunderˌheadedness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

dun•der•head

(ˈdʌn dərˌhɛd)

n.
a dunce; blockhead; numbskull. Also called dun•der•pate (ˈdʌn dərˌpeɪt)
[1615–25; appar. < Dutch dunder(kop) numbskull (dunder thunder + kop head) + head]
dun′der•head`ed, adj.
dun′der•head`ed•ness, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dunderhead - a stupid persondunderhead - a stupid person; these words are used to express a low opinion of someone's intelligence
dolt, dullard, pillock, poor fish, pudden-head, pudding head, stupe, stupid, stupid person - a person who is not very bright; "The economy, stupid!"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

dunderhead

[ˈdʌndəhed] Nzoquete m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

dunderhead

nDummkopf m, → Dummerjan m (inf)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
"That I can well believe," said Sancho at this, "for to come out with drolleries is not in everybody's line; and that Sancho your worship speaks of, gentle sir, must be some great scoundrel, dunderhead, and thief, all in one; for I am the real Sancho Panza, and I have more drolleries than if it rained them; let your worship only try; come along with me for a year or so, and you will find they fall from me at every turn, and so rich and so plentiful that though mostly I don't know what I am saying I make everybody that hears me laugh.
I never saw such a dunderhead; can't you understand anything at all?
"If I used my own some of these dunderheads would recognize it, and want to meddle in the affair."
North Wales PCC Mr Jones - whom Mr Liddle described as a "dunderhead" - shot back, saying: "As a progressive leftie I consider being slagged off in a 'conservative' Brit establishment magazine to be a badge of honour and I won't be losing any sleep over it."
"The Dunderheads" is a children's picturebook with a mischievous charm as the titular group made up offbeats with quirky kids with their own skills, as they set their sights on the tyrannical Miss Breakbone, who has earned a visit from the Dunderhead's maniacal plans.
Since then it has become an unwritten law as the country economy has gone down slowly due to the dunderhead of the Generals as one Junta after another have little or no idea of what is wrong with the economy, little realising that they themselves are the wrong persons to be in power.
In the normal course of business life, you don't get to be a director by being a dunderhead. (Some more battle-scarred veterans of board service might argue with me on that point!) I do believe that you have to have some special quality or position or talent to take a seat at the board table.
The supporting cast has a ball, notably Wahlberg who pokes gentle fun at his image as a dunderhead with a rippling six-pack.
Then consider how Alexander Cockburn described him last February in a CounterPunch article: "a dunderhead in statecraft, devoid of self control, capricious in moral standards and an imbecile in his lack of political judgment." Worst of all it shows, and "the better people get to know (him), the less they care for him." The public as well that's shifting more to Obama as the two candidates face off with four months to go until November.
His boss, a colonel referred to here simply as D1, is portrayed as a bit of dunderhead, seldom taking Gilster's advice or sharing his insights.
This is no layabout trying to shirk his responsibilities, nor do we have a dunderhead who can't even recognize his own name when authority calls (as in, say, "Before the Law" [1914]).
It flattered and entertained the driver rather than assuming that anybody who drove a family car was a dunderhead.