dung fly

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Related to dung flies: Fruit flies, yellow dung flies

dung fly

n
(Animals) any of various muscid flies of the subfamily Cordilurinae, such as the predatory yellow dung fly (Scatophaga stercoraria), that frequents cowpats to feed and lay its eggs
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He recorded the dawn chorus on Newcastle United Golf Course (part of the Town Moor), the cows grazing and mooching, insects communicating underwater in the lake in Exhibition Park and even dung flies in a cow pat.
9 and Redcar angler Derek Ogden enjoyed a fantastic loyalty, catching a grand total of 29 rainbows and returning 19 of them using a combination of a silver and gold Invicta and Cow Dung flies.
Washington, April 14 ( ANI ): European and North American black scavenger flies - also called dung flies as their larvae develop in the faeces of vertebrates and thus break them down - belong to the same species, but they strongly differ in mating behaviour and SSD.
European dung flies, however, are more unusual with males being considerably larger than females.
European and North American dung flies also differ in their mating frequency.
At present, stress counsellors go from one nervous wreck to the next like dung flies ever in search of a richer heap of sh-manure.
Washington, June 25 (ANI): In the world of yellow dung flies, the small guys can also get the girl, but only if they are hanging out on apple pomace instead of cow dung, reveals a new study.
undergraduate students found that small male dung flies, which are traditionally unsuccessful at finding and keeping mates on dung pats, successfully mated with females feeding on composting apple pomace.
Small male dung flies can't compete with their larger counterparts on the dung, so in this case, they developed a different tactic to successfully pass their genes to the next generation," said Scott Pitnick, professor of biology in SU's College of Arts and Sciences.
The students were tasked with designing a study around the size and mating success of yellow dung flies.
The researchers believed that yellow dung flies mated almost exclusively on manure and females were drawn to the dung only when they are ready to mate.
However, evidence from studies of midges, dung flies and seed beetles reveals that smaller males develop sooner than larger males and often mate before larger competing males arrive on the scene.