dunnock

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Related to dunnocks: hedge sparrow

dunnock

(ˈdʌnək)
n
(Animals) another name for hedge sparrow
[C15: from dun2 + -ock]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dunnock - small brownish European songbirddunnock - small brownish European songbird  
accentor - small sparrow-like songbird of mountainous regions of Eurasia
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

dunnock

[ˈdʌnək] Nacentor m (común)
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in classic literature ?
And Hareton has been cast out like an unfledged dunnock! The unfortunate lad is the only one in all this parish that does not guess how he has been cheated.'
He or she - the two are alike - added its presence to the large population of similarly sized siskins, the redfaced goldfinches, the chaffinches, greenfinches (there were four here the other day feeding on the dandelion seeds), the dunnocks and the clamorous house sparrows.
Dunnocks are easily overlooked as "house sparrows", which possibly is the reason for their alternative name of hedge sparrow.
Some, such as robins and dunnocks, are ground feeders, whereas blue tits and great spotted woodpeckers prefer hanging feeders.
Birds along the woodland trail, such as robins, dunnocks and blackbirds, as well as house sparrows around the visitor centre, have started to sing as they defend their nesting areas.
Some of the scrub will be cut back to create a patchwork of grass, flowers and bushes, enabling the bramble to regenerate over the coming years and provide cover for nesting birds such as Whitethroats and Dunnocks.
Other good news is an increase in the numbers of more secretive birds like wrens and dunnocks in Wales this year.
For instance, sunflower hearts attract coal tits and chaffinches, a ground mix will work for dunnocks and wrens, while sparrows eat almost anything.
Our own, hard-working, native dunnocks have to get up early in the morning to feed them, while the cuckoo idles about in the tree canopy.
It also provides excellent habitat for other bird species, the meadow pipits and dunnocks, both of which become unsuspecting foster parents to cuckoo eggs.
Other losers were dunnocks, down by 16% in Tyne Wear, 10% in County Durham and 12% in Northumberland.
Species nesting in hedges include blackbirds, wrens, robins, bullfinches, whitethroats, linnets, yellowhammers, dunnocks and willow warblers.