duodecimo


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du·o·dec·i·mo

 (do͞o′ə-dĕs′ə-mō′, dyo͞o′-)
n. pl. du·o·dec·i·mos
1. The size (5 by 7 3/4 inches) of book pages formed by folding single sheets from a printing press into 12 leaves each.
2. A book composed of pages of this size. In both senses also called twelvemo.

[Latin (in) duodecimō, (in) a twelfth, ablative of duodecimus, twelfth; see duodecimal.]

duodecimo

(ˌdjuːəʊˈdɛsɪˌməʊ)
n, pl -mos
1. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) Also called: twelvemo a book size resulting from folding a sheet of paper into twelve leaves. Often written: 12mo or 12°
2. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) a book of this size
[C17: from Latin phrase in duodecimō in twelfth, from duodecim twelve]

du•o•dec•i•mo

(ˌdu əˈdɛs əˌmoʊ, ˌdyu-)

n., pl. -mos,
adj. n.
1. a book size of about 5 x 7½ in. (13 x 19 cm), determined by printing on sheets folded to form 12 leaves or 24 pages. Symbol: 12 mo, 12°
2. a book of this size.
adj.
3. in duodecimo; twelvemo.
Also called twelvemo.
[1650–60; short for Latin in duodecimō in twelfth]
Translations
dotzè
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
If any of the following whales, shall hereafter be caught and marked, then he can readily be incorporated into this System, according to his Folio, Octavo, or Duodecimo magnitude: --The Bottle-Nose Whale; the Junk Whale; the Pudding-Headed Whale; the Cape Whale; the Leading Whale; the Cannon Whale; the Scragg Whale; the Coppered Whale; the Elephant Whale; the Iceberg Whale; the Quog Whale; the Blue Whale; etc.
They still dream of experimental realisation of their social Utopias, of founding isolated "phalansteres," of establishing "Home Colonies," of setting up a "Little Icaria" -- duodecimo editions of the New Jerusalem -- and to realise all these castles in the air, they are compelled to appeal to the feelings and purses of the bourgeois.
Then followed the history and rise of the ancient and respectable family, in the usual terms; how it had been first settled in Cheshire; how mentioned in Dugdale, serving the office of high sheriff, representing a borough in three successive parliaments, exertions of loyalty, and dignity of baronet, in the first year of Charles II, with all the Marys and Elizabeths they had married; forming altogether two handsome duodecimo pages, and concluding with the arms and motto:--"Principal seat, Kellynch Hall, in the county of Somerset," and Sir Walter's handwriting again in this finale:--
Miss Morland has been talking of nothing more dreadful than a new publication which is shortly to come out, in three duodecimo volumes, two hundred and seventy-six pages in each, with a frontispiece to the first, of two tombstones and a lantern -- do you understand?
A light bookcase contained duodecimo volumes of polite literature in calf, completing the furniture.
He got the Galoshes, and he was soon below in a little duodecimo garden, where between two immense walls a plumtree and an apple-tree were standing.
But the story would include a chain of events extending over the better part of two centuries, and, written out with reasonable amplitude, would fill a bigger folio volume, or a longer series of duodecimos, than could prudently be appropriated to the annals of all New England during a similar period.
Around the walls stood several oaken bookcases, the lower shelves of which were filled with rows of gigantic folios and black-letter quartos, and the upper with little parchment-covered duodecimos.
There were huge, ponderous folios, and quartos, and little duodecimos, in English, Latin, Greek, Hebrew, Chaldaic, and all other languages that either originated at the confusion of Babel or have since come into use.
But the most interesting object of all was, perhaps, the open scrapbook, displayed in the midst of some theatrical duodecimos that were strewn upon the table; and pasted into which scrapbook were various critical notices of Miss Snevellicci's acting, extracted from different provincial journals, together with one poetic address in her honour, commencing--
During the three months voyage to India he 'devoured' and in many cases copiously annotated a vast number of books in 'Greek, Latin, Spanish, Italian, French, and English; folios, quartos, octavos, and duodecimos.
Niel listed changes made to the duodecimo edition (by comparing the rejected pages and the substituted ones) and to the octavo (by comparing the duodecimo pages to the octavo's cancels).