durableness


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du·ra·ble

 (do͝or′ə-bəl, dyo͝or′-)
adj.
1.
a. Capable of withstanding wear and tear or decay: a durable fabric.
b. Made to withstand repeated use over a relatively long period, usually several years or more: durable goods such as washing machines and dryers.
2. Able to perform or compete over a long period, as by avoiding or overcoming injuries: a durable fullback.
3. Lasting; stable: a durable friendship.
n.
A good or product made to withstand repeated use over a relatively long period, usually several years or more: tracked the orders for automobiles and other durables.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin dūrābilis, from dūrāre, to last; see deuə- in Indo-European roots.]

du′ra·bil′i·ty, du′ra·ble·ness n.
du′ra·bly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Wrestling is one of the sports branches which require all psychomotor characteristics like power, durableness, flexibility, balance, speed, ability, timing and reaction time (Acikada and Ergen 1994).
Western Australia regarded the Wellington Jarrah as a singular exception to the 'remarkable durableness' of that timber.
The a priori distinction between "temporary" and "durable" solutions is largely an institutional and policy construction, since the displaced themselves rarely have a clearly phased or linear interpretation of the temporariness or durableness of their current life situation.