duress


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du·ress

 (do͝o-rĕs′, dyo͝o-)
n.
1.
a. Compulsion by threat or violence; coercion: confessed under duress.
b. Constraint or difficulty caused by misfortune: "children who needed only temporary care because their parents were ill, out of work, or under some other form of duress" (Stephan O'Connor).
2. Law
a. A fraud achieved through the use of a threat or compulsion: She had a cause of action for duress. His claim was based on duress.
b. A criminal defense for an act undertaken under threat of serious bodily harm: His defense was duress.
3. Forcible confinement.

[Middle English duresse, harshness, compulsion, from Old French durece, hardness, from Latin dūritia, from dūrus, hard; see deru- in Indo-European roots.]

duress

(djʊˈrɛs; djʊə-)
n
1. compulsion by use of force or threat; constraint; coercion (often in the phrase under duress)
2. (Law) law the illegal exercise of coercion
3. confinement; imprisonment
[C14: from Old French duresse, from Latin dūritia hardness, from dūrus hard]

du•ress

(dʊˈrɛs, dyʊ-, ˈdʊər ɪs, ˈdyʊər-)

n.
1. compulsion by threat or force.
2. constraint or coercion of a degree sufficient to void any legal agreement entered into or any act performed under its influence.
3. forcible restraint, esp. imprisonment.
[1275–1325; Middle English duresse < Middle French duresse, -esce, -ece < Latin dūritia hardness, harshness, oppression]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.duress - compulsory force or threat; "confessed under duress"
force - a powerful effect or influence; "the force of his eloquence easily persuaded them"

duress

noun
1. pressure, threat, constraint, compulsion, coercion Her confession had been made under duress.

duress

noun
Power used to overcome resistance:
Translations
اکراه

duress

[djʊəˈres] N under duressbajo presión

duress

[djʊˈrɛs djʊəˈrɛs] n
under duress → sous la contrainte

duress

nZwang m; he signed the form under duresser hat die Unterschrift unter Zwang geleistet

duress

[djʊˈrɛs] n under duresssotto costrizione, con la coercizione

duress

n. coerción; coacción,
under ___bajo ___.
References in classic literature ?
The young men of the Clover Leaf Club pinned not their faith to the graces of person as much as they did to its prowess, its achievements in hand-to-hand conflicts, and its preservation from the legal duress that constantly menaced it.
The crowd without gave way, and several warriors entered the place, bringing with them the hapless conjurer, who had been left so long by the scout in duress.
Javed Iqbal has directed to expedite the seeking of information and record from State Bank of Pakistan, SECP and FBR sans sustaining any duress.
Contract awarded for WA Country Health Service (WACHS) is seeking to procure a system, including all required software, licences, hardware and support services, to provide Mobile Duress functionality for the new Karratha Health Campus (KHC).
Mr Odinga, in a statement issued through his adviser Salim Lone, said the Jubilee government was illegitimate, adding that the Supreme Court decision was made under duress.
The country's highest court ruled that the appeals court failed to investigate claims made by some defendants that they confessed under duress.
The article discusses the implications for the defence of duress in particular, given its relevance to many refugee claimants.
Mike Tholen, economics director at industry body Oil and Gas UK, said "inevitably there will be further job losses" as firms operating in the UK continental shelf are under "such big duress from the fall in oil prices".
She states that she was not provided with an opportunity to seek legal advice, nor to take a copy of the agreement, and that her consent was therefore obtained by duress and undue influence.
Twenty-four hours later, multiple news sources reported that Griner filed annulment papers, citing "fraud and duress," that Griner was "pressured into marriage under duress by [Johnson's] threatening statements.
The Public Prosecution charged them with torturing a detainee into confessing under duress as stipulated in the provisions of the Penal Law.
2) The majority construed the FAA to allow for the invalidation of arbitration clauses "by 'generally applicable contract defenses, such as fraud, duress, or unconscionability,' but not by defenses that apply only to arbitration or that derive their meaning from the fact that an agreement to arbitrate is at issue.