dusky

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dusk·y

 (dŭs′kē)
adj. dusk·i·er, dusk·i·est
1. Having low diffused light; dim or shadowy.
2. Rather dark in color: dusky blue. See Synonyms at dark.

dusk′i·ly adv.
dusk′i·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

dusky

(ˈdʌskɪ)
adj, duskier or duskiest
1. dark in colour; swarthy or dark-skinned
2. dim
ˈduskily adv
ˈduskiness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

dusk•y

(ˈdʌs ki)

adj. dusk•i•er, dusk•i•est.
1. somewhat dark; dimly lit; shadowy.
2. having dark skin.
3. of a dark color.
4. gloomy; sad.
[1550–60; dusk2 + -y1]
dusk′i•ly, adv.
dusk′i•ness, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.dusky - lighted by or as if by twilightdusky - lighted by or as if by twilight; "The dusky night rides down the sky/And ushers in the morn"-Henry Fielding; "the twilight glow of the sky"; "a boat on a twilit river"
dark - devoid of or deficient in light or brightness; shadowed or black; "sitting in a dark corner"; "a dark day"; "dark shadows"; "dark as the inside of a black cat"
2.dusky - naturally having skin of a dark color; "a dark-skinned beauty"; "gold earrings gleamed against her dusky cheeks"; "a smile on his swarthy face"; "`swart' is archaic"
archaicism, archaism - the use of an archaic expression
brunet, brunette - marked by dark or relatively dark pigmentation of hair or skin or eyes; "a brunette beauty"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

dusky

adjective
1. dim, twilight, shady, shadowy, gloomy, murky, cloudy, overcast, crepuscular, darkish, twilit, tenebrous, caliginous (archaic) He was walking down the road one dusky evening.
2. dark, swarthy, dark-complexioned I could see dusky girls with flowers about their necks.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

dusky

adjective
1. Deficient in brightness:
2. Somewhat black:
3. Of a complexion tending toward brown or black:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
قاتِم اللوْن
temný
dystermørkmørkladen
myrkur; dökkleitur; drungalegur
koyucaloş

dusky

[ˈdʌskɪ] ADJ [pink, blue] → oscuro; [complexion] → moreno
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

dusky

[ˈdʌski] adj [evening] → sombre
dusky pink → vieux rose
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

dusky

adj (+er) (liter) room, evening, skin, colourdunkel; persondunkelhäutig; lightschwach; the light in the room was duskyes war dämmerig im Zimmer; dusky pinkaltrosa
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

dusky

[ˈdʌskɪ] adj (complexion, room, light) → scuro/a
dusky pink → rosa antico inv
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

dusk

(dask) noun
(the time of) partial darkness after the sun sets; twilight.
ˈdusky adjective
dark-coloured.
ˈduskiness noun
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
Grose looked round once more; she fixed her eyes on the duskier distance, then, pulling herself together, turned to me with abrupt inconsequence.
Hester Prynne looked at the man of skill, and even then, with her fate hanging in the balance, was startled to perceive what a change had come over his features -- how much uglier they were, how his dark complexion seemed to have grown duskier, and his figure more misshapen -- since the days when she had familiarly known him.
It was now so nearly sunset that the chamber had grown duskier than ever; but a mild and moonlike splendor gleamed from within the vase, and rested alike on the four guests and on the doctor's venerable figure.
The two owls, the swallow, all three species of mocking-thrush, the dove in its separate colours though not in its whole plumage, the Totanus, and the gull, are likewise duskier coloured than their analogous species; and in the case of the mocking- thrush and Totanus, than any other species of the two genera.
A still duskier place is this, with such low ponderous beams above, and such old wrinkled planks beneath, that you would almost fancy you trod some old craft's cockpits, especially of such a howling night, when this corner-anchored old ark rocked so furiously.
One, to be sure, had hair a shade darker than the other, and there was a difference in their style of wearing it; Mary's pale brown locks were parted and braided smooth: Diana's duskier tresses covered her neck with thick curls.
But the duskier it grew, the more did Pluto's visage assume an air of satisfaction.
The second bedroom conveys a duskier tone with spectacular black and grey marbled wallpaper as a feature wall.
PICK A PEACH OF A COLOUR "Perfect for adding warmth to a space, peach is popping up all over the interiors world, eclipsing Millennial Pink, its duskier and more muted cousin," says Nadia McCowan Hill, style advisor for interiors brand, Wayfair.
You can add in pastels, but shades with duskier undertones look more refined than punchy ones (strong pastels can be a bit like a baby's bedroom).
You can add in pastels as well, but shades with duskier undertones look more refined than punchy ones (strong pastels can be a bit like a baby's bedroom).
The terrain around the southern pole is somewhat duskier than Mercury's average surface, but Schroter's blunted southern horn must have been, in part, an effect of contrast with the brighter northern one.