dike

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dike 1

also dyke  (dīk)
n.
1.
a. An embankment of earth and rock built to prevent floods.
b. Chiefly British A low wall, often of sod, dividing or enclosing lands.
2. A barrier blocking a passage, especially for protection.
3. A raised causeway.
4. A ditch; a channel.
5. Geology A long mass of igneous rock that cuts across the structure of adjacent rock.
tr.v. diked, dik·ing, dikes also dyked or dyk·ing or dykes
1. To protect, enclose, or provide with a dike.
2. To drain with dikes or ditches.

[Middle English, from Old English dīc, trench; see dhīgw- in Indo-European roots, and from Old Norse dīki, ditch.]

dik′er n.

dike 2

 (dīk)
n. Offensive Slang
Variant of dyke2.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

dike

(daɪk)
n, vb
1. (Civil Engineering) a variant spelling of dyke1
2. (Geological Science) a variant spelling of dyke1

dike

(daɪk)
n
a variant spelling of dyke2
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

dike1

or dyke

(daɪk)

n., v. diked, dik•ing. n.
1. an embankment for controlling or holding back the waters of the sea or a river.
2. ditch.
3. a bank of earth formed of material being excavated.
5. an obstacle; barrier.
6.
a. a long, narrow, cross-cutting mass of igneous rock intruded into a fissure in older rock.
b. a similar mass of rock composed of other kinds of material, as sandstone.
v.t.
7. to furnish or drain with a dike.
8. to enclose, restrain, or protect by a dike.
[before 900; dik(e), Old English dīc < Old Norse dīki; akin to ditch]
dik′er, n.

dike2

(daɪk)

n.
dike′y, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

dike

(dīk)
A long mass of igneous rock that cuts across the structure of adjoining rock. It is often of a different composition than the rock it cuts across and can be useful in determining the age relationship between rocks.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

dike


Past participle: diked
Gerund: diking

Imperative
dike
dike
Present
I dike
you dike
he/she/it dikes
we dike
you dike
they dike
Preterite
I diked
you diked
he/she/it diked
we diked
you diked
they diked
Present Continuous
I am diking
you are diking
he/she/it is diking
we are diking
you are diking
they are diking
Present Perfect
I have diked
you have diked
he/she/it has diked
we have diked
you have diked
they have diked
Past Continuous
I was diking
you were diking
he/she/it was diking
we were diking
you were diking
they were diking
Past Perfect
I had diked
you had diked
he/she/it had diked
we had diked
you had diked
they had diked
Future
I will dike
you will dike
he/she/it will dike
we will dike
you will dike
they will dike
Future Perfect
I will have diked
you will have diked
he/she/it will have diked
we will have diked
you will have diked
they will have diked
Future Continuous
I will be diking
you will be diking
he/she/it will be diking
we will be diking
you will be diking
they will be diking
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been diking
you have been diking
he/she/it has been diking
we have been diking
you have been diking
they have been diking
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been diking
you will have been diking
he/she/it will have been diking
we will have been diking
you will have been diking
they will have been diking
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been diking
you had been diking
he/she/it had been diking
we had been diking
you had been diking
they had been diking
Conditional
I would dike
you would dike
he/she/it would dike
we would dike
you would dike
they would dike
Past Conditional
I would have diked
you would have diked
he/she/it would have diked
we would have diked
you would have diked
they would have diked
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011

dike


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A vertical sheet of igneous rock that has intruded across older rocks.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dike - (slang) offensive term for a lesbian who is noticeably masculine
derogation, disparagement, depreciation - a communication that belittles somebody or something
jargon, lingo, patois, argot, vernacular, slang, cant - a characteristic language of a particular group (as among thieves); "they don't speak our lingo"
gay woman, lesbian, tribade - a female homosexual
2.dike - a barrier constructed to contain the flow of water or to keep out the sea
barrier - a structure or object that impedes free movement
milldam - dam to make a millpond to provide power for a water mill
weir - a low dam built across a stream to raise its level or divert its flow
Verb1.dike - enclose with a dike; "dike the land to protect it from water"
inclose, shut in, close in, enclose - surround completely; "Darkness enclosed him"; "They closed in the porch with a fence"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
سَد، حاجِز
flóîgarîur, stíflugarîur
aizsprostsdambis

dyke,

dike

(daik) noun
an embankment built as a barrier against the sea etc.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.