dynamite


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dy·na·mite

 (dī′nə-mīt′)
n.
1. Any of a class of powerful explosives composed of nitroglycerin or ammonium nitrate dispersed in an absorbent medium with a combustible dope, such as wood pulp, and an antacid, such as calcium carbonate, used in blasting and mining.
2. Slang
a. Something exceptionally exciting or wonderful.
b. Something exceptionally dangerous: These allegations are political dynamite.
tr.v. dy·na·mit·ed, dy·na·mit·ing, dy·na·mites
To blow up, shatter, or otherwise destroy with dynamite.
adj. Slang
Outstanding; superb: a dynamite performance; a dynamite outfit.

[Swedish dynamit, from Greek dunamis, power; see dynamic.]

dy′na·mit′er n.
Word History: The Nobel Prizes were established by the Swedish chemist and industrialist Alfred Nobel (1833-1896) with funds from his immense personal fortune, amassed in part through the manufacture of explosives and armaments. Nobel was the inventor of dynamite—he had discovered that the highly explosive chemical compound nitroglycerine could be made easier to transport and handle if it was mixed with an inert substance. To name his mixture, Nobel invented the word dynamite. Originally coined in Swedish in the form dynamit, the word was compounded from Greek dunamis, "power," and the Swedish suffix -it, which corresponds to the English suffix -ite used to form the names of rocks, minerals, commercial products, and other substances. Greek dunamis also gave us words such as dynamic and dynamo. Dunamis is related to the Greek verb dunasthai, "to be able," from which comes English dynasty, denoting a family or group that wields power over several generations.

dynamite

(ˈdaɪnəˌmaɪt)
n
1. (Firearms, Gunnery, Ordnance & Artillery) an explosive consisting of nitroglycerine or ammonium nitrate mixed with kieselguhr, sawdust, or wood pulp
2. informal a spectacular or potentially dangerous person or thing
vb
(Firearms, Gunnery, Ordnance & Artillery) (tr) to mine or blow up with dynamite
[C19 (coined by Alfred Nobel): from dynamo- + -ite1]
ˈdynaˌmiter n

dy•na•mite

(ˈdaɪ nəˌmaɪt)

n., v. -mit•ed, -mit•ing,
adj. n.
1. a high explosive, orig. consisting of nitroglycerin mixed with an absorbent substance, now with ammonium nitrate usu. replacing the nitroglycerin.
2. any person or thing having a spectacular or potentially explosive effect.
v.t.
3. to blow up, shatter, or destroy with dynamite.
4. to mine or charge with dynamite.
adj.
5. Informal. wonderful or exciting: a dynamite idea.
[1867; < Swedish dynamit, introduced by A.B. Nobel, its inventor; see dyna-, -ite1]
dy′na•mit`er, n.
dy`na•mit′ic (-ˈmɪt ɪk) adj.
dy`na•mit′i•cal•ly, adv.

dy·na·mite

(dī′nə-mīt′)
A powerful explosive used in blasting and mining. It typically consists of nitroglycerin and a nitrate, combined with an absorbent material that makes it safer to handle.

dynamite


Past participle: dynamited
Gerund: dynamiting

Imperative
dynamite
dynamite
Present
I dynamite
you dynamite
he/she/it dynamites
we dynamite
you dynamite
they dynamite
Preterite
I dynamited
you dynamited
he/she/it dynamited
we dynamited
you dynamited
they dynamited
Present Continuous
I am dynamiting
you are dynamiting
he/she/it is dynamiting
we are dynamiting
you are dynamiting
they are dynamiting
Present Perfect
I have dynamited
you have dynamited
he/she/it has dynamited
we have dynamited
you have dynamited
they have dynamited
Past Continuous
I was dynamiting
you were dynamiting
he/she/it was dynamiting
we were dynamiting
you were dynamiting
they were dynamiting
Past Perfect
I had dynamited
you had dynamited
he/she/it had dynamited
we had dynamited
you had dynamited
they had dynamited
Future
I will dynamite
you will dynamite
he/she/it will dynamite
we will dynamite
you will dynamite
they will dynamite
Future Perfect
I will have dynamited
you will have dynamited
he/she/it will have dynamited
we will have dynamited
you will have dynamited
they will have dynamited
Future Continuous
I will be dynamiting
you will be dynamiting
he/she/it will be dynamiting
we will be dynamiting
you will be dynamiting
they will be dynamiting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been dynamiting
you have been dynamiting
he/she/it has been dynamiting
we have been dynamiting
you have been dynamiting
they have been dynamiting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been dynamiting
you will have been dynamiting
he/she/it will have been dynamiting
we will have been dynamiting
you will have been dynamiting
they will have been dynamiting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been dynamiting
you had been dynamiting
he/she/it had been dynamiting
we had been dynamiting
you had been dynamiting
they had been dynamiting
Conditional
I would dynamite
you would dynamite
he/she/it would dynamite
we would dynamite
you would dynamite
they would dynamite
Past Conditional
I would have dynamited
you would have dynamited
he/she/it would have dynamited
we would have dynamited
you would have dynamited
they would have dynamited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dynamite - an explosive containing nitrate sensitized with nitroglycerin absorbed on wood pulpdynamite - an explosive containing nitrate sensitized with nitroglycerin absorbed on wood pulp
explosive compound - a compound that is explosive
gelignite, gelly - a type of dynamite in which the nitroglycerin is absorbed in a base of wood pulp and sodium or potassium nitrate
glyceryl trinitrate, nitroglycerin, nitroglycerine, Nitrospan, Nitrostat, trinitroglycerin - a heavy yellow poisonous oily explosive liquid obtained by nitrating glycerol; used in making explosives and medically as a vasodilator (trade names Nitrospan and Nitrostat)
Verb1.dynamite - blow up with dynamite; "The rock was dynamited"
blow up, detonate, explode, set off - cause to burst with a violent release of energy; "We exploded the nuclear bomb"

dynamite

verb
To pull down or break up so that reconstruction is impossible:
Aerospace: destruct.
Translations
ديناميت، نَسّاف
dynamit
dynamit
dinamit
dÿnamít
ダイナマイト
dinamitas
dinamīts
dynamietdynamiteren
dynamit
dinamit

dynamite

[ˈdaɪnəmaɪt]
A. N
1. (= explosive) → dinamita f
2. (fig) he's dynamite!¡es estupendo!
the story is dynamite (Press) → la noticia es una bomba or pura dinamita
B. VT [+ bridge etc] → dinamitar, volar con dinamita

dynamite

[ˈdaɪnəmaɪt]
n (= explosive) → dynamite f
to be dynamite [revelation, statement] (= highly contentious) → être une bombe ; [person, film] (= very exciting) → être du tonnerre
vt (= blow up) → dynamiter, faire sauter à la dynamite

dynamite

n (lit)Dynamit nt; (fig)Zünd- or Sprengstoff m; she is dynamitesie ist eine Wucht (inf); that story is pure dynamitediese Geschichte ist der reinste Zündstoff
vt rocks, bridgesprengen

dynamite

[ˈdaɪnəˌmaɪt]
1. n
a.dinamite f
b. (fig) (fam) he's dynamite!è una bomba!
the story is dynamite → è una storia esplosiva
2. vtfar saltare con la dinamite

dynamite

(ˈdainəmait) noun
a type of powerful explosive.
References in classic literature ?
And the four of us landed on the little beach and set up housekeeping among the coconuts with a larder full of dynamite and square-face.
AN Officer of the Government, with a great outfit of mule-waggons loaded with balloons, kites, dynamite bombs, and electrical apparatus, halted in the midst of a desert, where there had been no rain for ten years, and set up a camp.
As the sand is being poured into the well-hole, quantities of dynamite can also be thrown in
When we were forty feet away and coming fast, he dropped the rifle, lighted a stick of dynamite with the cigar, and threw it at us.
A shock to a mass of dynamite produces quite different effects from an equal shock to a mass of steel: in the one case there is a vast explosion, while in the other case there is hardly any noticeable disturbance.
Van Horn, regarding the shore for some sign of life, lighted a cigar and put one hand to the waist-line of his loin-cloth to reassure himself of the presence of the stick of dynamite that was tucked between the loin-cloth and his skin.
Nestor has never quite forgiven me for that mistake about the dynamite box, and that wasn't my fault.
And I couldn't bear to see our love worn away by the daily dropping of tears, not to speak of its being rent by the dynamite of daily quarrels.
If only some hand," he remarked, "could plant dynamite below that streak of white, so that the sea could disgorge its dead
And his uneasiness grew by the recollection of the forty tons of dynamite in the body of the Ferndale; not the sort of cargo one thinks of with equanimity in connection with a threatened collision.
I remembered that in America, many centuries later, when an oil well ceased to flow, they used to blast it out with a dynamite torpedo.
Despite his warnings about crocodiles and sharks, she persisted in swimming in deep water off the beach; nor could he persuade her, when she was in the boat, to let one of the sailors throw the dynamite when shooting fish.