dyophysite


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dyophysite

(daɪˈɒfəˌsaɪt)
n
(Theology) theol the presence of the divine and human natures in Jesus Christ
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Soon afterward, the shah Khusrau II began to give clear signs of his interest in Christianity, likely prompting al-Nu'man's acceptance of Dyophysite Christianity in a ritual orchestrated by Shem'un.
Were Nestorians always dyophysite, while Nestorius was not, and Monophysites ever what the name given them by their opponents implied?
This line obviously had more serious christological repercussions in that it could be most easily accommodated by a more dyophysite approach, with Christ's partial ignorance being due to the (separate) human part of his nature.
Continuing opposition between the Dyophysites and the Monophysites in Egypt, particularly in Alexandria, was one of the factors that seriously weakened the Byzantines when they were confronted with an Arab invasion.
Only once did I find myself flagging while reading through Diarmaid MacCulloch's blockbuster history of Christianity and that was around page 245 in the midst of a lengthy and somewhat dense disquisition about relations between Miaphysites and Dyophysites in late fifth-century Syria and Ethiopia.
Interestingly, both sides of the debate, the so-called "dyophysites" and the "monophysites", recognized these texts as authoritative and supportive of their respective positions.(5)
not "without subsistence."(21) Cyril of Jerusalem in his Catechetical Lectures (XVII, 5) refers to the Holy Spirit as "not diffused throughout the air, but having actual subsistence [enypostaton]."(22) Leontius of Jerusalem, a contemporary of our Leontius, uses enypostatos to mean "subsisting" in his arguments with the dyophysites; for him, all natures are enypostaton.(23) John of Damascus in the eighth century used the terms in this straightforward way in his treatment of Cyril and Leontius of Byzantium in Book 3, Chapter 9, of De fide orthodoxa.