dysaesthesia


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dysaesthesia

(ˌdɪsɪsˈθiːzɪə)
n
a disagreeable sensation such as burning or itching arising from impairment of the nervous systema medical condition of which this is a manifestation
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The most common adverse reactions (20 percent) with Rozlytrek were fatigue, constipation, altered sense of taste (dysgeusia), swelling (oedema), dizziness, diarrhoea, nausea, nervous system disorders (dysaesthesia), shortness of breath (dyspnoea), muscle pain (myalgia), cognitive impairment, increased weight, cough, vomiting, fever (pyrexia), joint pain (arthralgia) and vision disorders.1
The most common adverse reactions (>=20 percent) with Rozlytrek were fatigue, constipation, altered sense of taste (dysgeusia), swelling (oedema), dizziness, diarrhoea, nausea, nervous system disorders (dysaesthesia), shortness of breath (dyspnoea), muscle pain (myalgia), cognitive impairment, increased weight, cough, vomiting, fever (pyrexia), joint pain (arthralgia) and vision disorders.1
Occasionally, he felt burning dysaesthesia in both his feet without any complaint of numbness.
The less frequent complications of RFA documented in the literature include diminished corneal sensation, masseter weakness, dysaesthesia, anaesthesia dolorosa, transient paralysis of cranial nerves III and VI, aseptic meningitis and carotico-cavernous fistula (15).
Periodontal disease is also the 6th most common result of diabetes mellitus.10 Other reported oral manifestation of diabetes are burning sensations, candidiasis, dental caries, lichen planus, neurosensory dysaesthesia, salivary dysfunction, xerostomia and halitosis.
Katzell, "Endoscopic foraminal decompression preceding oblique lateral lumbar interbody fusion to decrease the incidence of post operative dysaesthesia," International Journal of Spine Surgery, vol.
The sensory symptoms of pain, dysaesthesia, and paraesthesia characterize both diabetic PN and chemotherapy-induced PN, signifying the impact of these findings.
Capsaicin application in these patients could eliminate the factor resulting in dysaesthesia when they activate the remaining TRPV1 receptors, desensitizing the nerve terminals of nociceptors by destroying the remaining axons and nociceptors.
For instance, the absurd medical diagnoses of Drapetomania, "the disease causing negroes to run away," and Dysaesthesia Aethiopica, "a disease peculiar to negroes--called...
Apart from marked joint tenderness there was no significant dysaesthesia or sensory loss over the hands.