dysarthria


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dys·ar·thri·a

 (dĭs-är′thrē-ə)
n.
Difficulty in articulating words, caused by impairment of the muscles used in speech.

[dys- + Greek arthron, joint, (vocal) articulation; see ar- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

dysarthria

(dɪsˈɑːθrɪə)
n
(Medicine) imperfect articulation of speech caused by damage to the nervous system
[from dys- + arthria from Greek arthron articulation]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

dys•ar•thri•a

(dɪsˈɑr θri ə)

n.
difficulty in speech articulation due to poor muscular control, usu. related to nerve damage.
[1875–80; dys- + Greek árthr(on) joint + -ia]
dys•ar′thric, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dysarthria - impaired articulatory ability resulting from defects in the peripheral motor nerves or in the speech musculature
defect of speech, speech defect, speech disorder - a disorder of oral speech
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

dys·ar·thri·a

n. disartria, dificultad del habla a causa de una afección de la lengua u otro músculo esencial al lenguaje.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

dysarthria

n disartria
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Essential tremor is considered a slow progressive disorder and, in some people, may eventually involve the head, voice, tongue (with associated dysarthria), legs, and trunk.
The patient displayed typical myasthenic symptoms, including bilateral ptosis, Cogan's lid twitch signs, bilateral weakness of ocular movements, and dysarthria. Symptoms worsened with prolonged talking, including dysphagia and myasthenic weakness of all limbs, such that the patient was dependent on a wheelchair and unable to raise his arms.
Presenting her CUHK research, Professor Meng detailed how she developed the world's leading program capable of understanding the speech of people suffering from dysarthria, an impeded articulation of speech that results from stroke or cerebral palsy.
Smith said his client suffered permanent paralysis on his right side and severe dysarthria, a speech disorder.
A related condition known as dysarthria is causing the muscles in her mouth, tongue and throat to weaken.
In mid-November 2017, an elderly man with no serious medical problems was admitted to a hospital with dysarthria, dysphagia, and dyspnea of 3 days' duration.
The patient had developed dysarthria.[1] Was there also dysphagia, frequently associated with dysarthria?
Neurological examination revealed mild dysarthria; universal areflexia except for the left brachioradialis reflex and the Achilles reflex, which were in all cases +/++++; and tacto-algesic hypoesthesia of hands and feet with symmetrical and bilateral involvement.
Then, in chapters with a common format to facilitate comparisons, he describes types of dysarthria: flaccid, spastic, unilateral upper motor neuron, ataxic, hypokinetic, hyperkinetic, and mixed.