dysprosium


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dys·pro·si·um

 (dĭs-prō′zē-əm, -zhē-əm)
n. Symbol Dy
A soft, silvery metallic element of the lanthanide series occurring in the minerals monazite and bastnaesite, used in nuclear reactor control rods and in the manufacture of laser materials and compact discs. Atomic number 66; atomic weight 162.50; melting point 1,412°C; boiling point 2,567°C; specific gravity 8.551; valence 3. See Periodic Table.

[New Latin, from Greek dusprositos, difficult to approach (from its rarity in nature) : dus-, dys- + prositos, approachable (from prosienai, to approach : pros-, toward + ienai, i-, to go; see ei- in Indo-European roots).]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

dysprosium

(dɪsˈprəʊsɪəm)
n
(Elements & Compounds) a soft silvery-white metallic element of the lanthanide series: used in laser materials and as a neutron absorber in nuclear control rods. Symbol: Dy; atomic no: 66; atomic wt: 162.50; valency: 3; relative density: 8.551; melting pt: 1412°C; boiling pt: 2567°C
[C20: New Latin, from Greek dusprositos difficult to get near + -ium]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

dys•pro•si•um

(dɪsˈproʊ si əm, -ʃi-)

n.
a rare-earth element that is highly reactive and paramagnetic and used to absorb neutrons in nuclear reactors. Symbol: Dy; at. wt.: 162.50; at. no.: 66.
[< French (1886)]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

dys·pro·si·um

(dĭs-prō′zē-əm)
Symbol Dy A soft, silvery metallic element of the lanthanide series. Because it has a high melting point and absorbs neutrons well, dysprosium is used to help control nuclear reactions. Atomic number 66. See Periodic Table.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dysprosium - a trivalent metallic element of the rare earth groupdysprosium - a trivalent metallic element of the rare earth group; forms compounds that are highly magnetic
metal, metallic element - any of several chemical elements that are usually shiny solids that conduct heat or electricity and can be formed into sheets etc.
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
dysprosium
dysprosium
düsproosium
dysprosium
dysprosium
disprozij
diszprózium
dysprósín
ジスプロシウム
dysprosium
disprozis
dysprosium
dysproz
disprosiu
dysprosium
disprozij
dysprosium
References in periodicals archive ?
Critical REEs are defined here as those that are in short-supply and high-demand for use in permanent magnets and modern electronic applications (i.e.: Neodymium (Nd), Praseodymium (Pr) and Dysprosium (Dy)).
The researchers in Innsbruck experimentally created states showing these characteristics of supersolidity by tuning the interaction strength between the particles, in both erbium and dysprosium quantum gases.
Search terms were rare earth(s), lanthanide(s), lanthanum, cerium, praseodymium, neodymium, promethium, samarium, europium, gadolinium, terbium, dysprosium, holmium, erbium, thulium, ytterbium, scandium and yttrium.
Terbium and dysprosium are also critical in defence technologies, ceramics and advanced magnets.
Gehm, Hitachi Metals Reduces Rare-earth Dysprosium in Electric-Motors Magnets, SAE International, Pittsburgh, PA, United States, 2013, http://articles.sae.org/11988.
Dysprosium oxide ([Dy.sub.2][O.sub.3]) at 99.99% purity was provided by Shanghai Yuelong Rare Earth New Materials Co., Ltd., China.
Following salts of lanthanides were used as standards: Samarium (III) chloride hexahydrate, Lanthanum (III) nitrate hexahydrate, Europium (III) nitrate hexahydrate, Terbium (III) nitrate hexahydrate, Holmium(III) nitrate hydrate, Thulium (III) nitrate hexahydrate, Lutetium (III) nitrate hexahydrate, Erbium (III) nitrate hexahydrate, Samarium (III) nitrate hexahydrate, Neodymium (III) nitrate hexahydrate, Gadolinium (III) nitrate hexahydrate, Dysprosium (III) nitrate pentahydrate, Ytterbium (III) nitrate pentahydrate, and Cerium (III) nitrate hexahydrate.
Hybrid vehicles combining a gasoline engine and electric motor have become increasingly popular in many countries, but sourcing a steady supply of rare earth elements such as dysprosium and terbium has been a challenge.
Dysprosium prices have climbed 3 percent from the previous month to $265 per kilogram, while prices of terbium, a phosphor raw material, have increased 11 percent to around $570 per kilogram.
Perhaps most important, Alaska's mineral endowment is both enormous and varied, ranging from precious metals like gold, silver, platinum, and palladium, through base metals like copper, lead, zinc, and molybdenum, to critical and strategic metals like dysprosium, graphite, tin, tantalum, and cobalt.
If we succeed in meeting the International Energy Agency's minimum recommendation of nearly quadrupling wind power capacity by 2030, growing electric vehicle use more than 100-fold by 2025, and increasing battery efficiency, speciality metals like dysprosium and cobalt will take centre stage.