dysreflexia


Also found in: Medical.

dys·re·flex·i·a

 (dĭs′rĭ-flĕk′sē-ə)
n.
Abnormally increased or decreased response to physiologic stimuli.
Translations

dys·re·flex·i·a

n. disrreflexia, condición por la cual las reacciones a estímulos son inapropiadas o fuera de orden.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Few primary care, general medicine or internal medicine clinicians outside of the VA possess the expertise to understand neurogenic bladder management, autonomic dysreflexia or other issues particular to SCI/D, Martinez says.
Although no adverse effects were reported, the literature documents cases of adverse effects, including a case of autonomic dysreflexia in a man with tetraplegia (Safez, Kesikburun, Omac, Tugcu, & Alaca, 2010) and nine others that included massive gastrointestinal hemorrhage, necrosis and ulceration due to pressure, infection, and even death with use of the Flexi-Seal[R] device (Mulhall & Jindal, 2017).
A less common condition--autonomic dysreflexia, which is a distinct type of autonomic dysfunction, and a true medical emergency--is also important to keep in mind.
Complications were limited to the following: pressure ulcers; pulmonary complications, including atelectasis and pneumonia; urinary tract infection; deepvein thrombosis; neuropathic pain; pulmonary embolism; orthostatic hypotension; and autonomic dysreflexia.
Hospital Management also includes management of neurogenic shock, Spinal shock and Autonomic dysreflexia.
8[degrees]C); worsening of neuropathic pain and/or spasticity; autonomic dysreflexia of unknown cause; increased urine loss between bladder catheterization; gastric symptoms (nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite); lower back or suprapubic pain; dysuria; antibiotic use for treatment of UTI within seven days of the procedure.
These include orthostatic hypotension, autonomic dysreflexia (a medical emergency), pressure ulcers, hypercalciurea, infections) and cancer5-9.
Autonomic dysreflexia (AD) can be a life-threatening complication of spinal cord injury (SCI), and management is largely supportive with removal of underlying noxious stimuli.
Defines complications associated with neurogenic bladder 0 pt: Does not mention any dangers 1 pt: Mentions one of: UTI, autonomic dysreflexia, vesico- ureteral reflux/hydronephrosis 2 pts: Mentions more than one of above Q23.
This includes, but is not limited to, anatomy and physiology, bladder, bowel and skin management, autonomic dysreflexia and sexuality rehabilitation.
In addition, preventative education on SCI-related precautions and contraindications relating to nutrition, hydration, clean catheterization, dysreflexia, and hypotension should be a part of routine patient education protocols (Lyder & Ayello, 2008; McKinley, Jackson, Cardenas, & DeVivo, 1999).
There were no reported issues with skin management, autonomic dysreflexia, urinary catheter, or bowel management resulting from prone positioning on the cart.