dysrhythmia

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dys·rhyth·mi·a

 (dĭs-rĭth′mē-ə)
n.
An abnormality in an otherwise normal rhythmic pattern, as of brain waves being recorded by an electroencephalograph.

[New Latin : dys- + Latin rhythmus, rhythm; see rhythm.]

dysrhythmia

(dɪsˈrɪðmɪə)
n
1. an irregular rhythm
2. (Pathology) an irregular and unusual rhythm of the heart
3. (Pathology) an unusual pattern of brain activity as registered by an electroencephalogram

dys•rhyth•mi•a

(dɪsˈrɪð mi ə)

n.
a disturbance of rhythm, as of speech patterns or brain waves.
[1905–10; < Greek dys- dys- + rhythm(ós) rhythm + -ia -ia]
Translations

dys·rhyth·mi·a

n. disritmia, sin coordinación o ritmo.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs)--cardiac pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators--are an established treatment for the management of cardiac dysrhythmias in millions of patients.
The Oleander, which is also referred to as the Desert Rose, is toxic and can cause dysrhythmias, seizures, tremors and even induce a coma.
Transient atrial fibrillation was present in 1 (3.84%) patient in Gp I and 4 in (15.38%) in Gp II, while ventricular dysrhythmias were observed in 1 (3.84%) in Gp I and 3 (11.5%) in Gp II.
(6) Other late effects of untreated HH include bronzing of the skin, infertility and erectile dysfunction, cardiomyopathy and dysrhythmias. (6)
When the ECGs of patients with a high troponin value were examined, it was found that tachycardia was statistically significant in terms of development of dysrhythmias (p=0.015).
Cardiac dysrhythmias are commonly seen with seizures, especially generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS).
Introduction to Basic Cardiac Dysrhythmias, 5th Edition
Survivors were about 50% more likely to be diagnosed with cardiac dysrhythmias, compared with the general population both at 1-5 years (hazard ratio, 1.55; 99% confidence interval, 1.23-1.97) and 5-10 years (HR, 1.41; 99% CI, 1.06-1.88) after diagnosis, according to reported data.
The mean arterial pressure increased to 80 mmHg, and there was no further occurrence of ventricular dysrhythmias.
Other electrocardiographic manifestations of hypothermia include PR-, QRS- and QT-interval prolongation, as well as atrial and ventricular dysrhythmias. The ECG in hypothermia may also mimic a myocardial infarction and conceal the typical ECG findings in hyperkalaemia.
Cardiac dysrhythmias other than tachycardia are not common in hyponatremia.
The strict exclusion of patients who already had any history of dysrhythmias and low EF, which has often been omitted in prior studies, was expected to have yielded less ambiguous results.