dysrhythmia

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dys·rhyth·mi·a

 (dĭs-rĭth′mē-ə)
n.
An abnormality in an otherwise normal rhythmic pattern, as of brain waves being recorded by an electroencephalograph.

[New Latin : dys- + Latin rhythmus, rhythm; see rhythm.]

dysrhythmia

(dɪsˈrɪðmɪə)
n
1. an irregular rhythm
2. (Pathology) an irregular and unusual rhythm of the heart
3. (Pathology) an unusual pattern of brain activity as registered by an electroencephalogram

dys•rhyth•mi•a

(dɪsˈrɪð mi ə)

n.
a disturbance of rhythm, as of speech patterns or brain waves.
[1905–10; < Greek dys- dys- + rhythm(ós) rhythm + -ia -ia]
Translations

dys·rhyth·mi·a

n. disritmia, sin coordinación o ritmo.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Other electrocardiographic manifestations of hypothermia include PR-, QRS- and QT-interval prolongation, as well as atrial and ventricular dysrhythmias.
Cardiac dysrhythmias other than tachycardia are not common in hyponatremia.
atrio-ventricular block, atrial fibrillation, supra-ventricular and junctional dysrhythmias than LAA.
Dysrhythmias characterized by increased automaticity and conduction blockade, when combined, are highly suggestive of glycoside etiology (11).
Cardiac conduction disturbances were reported in 24 (13%) patients, ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation in 16 (9%) patients, other dysrhythmias in 10 (6%) patients, and other electrocardiogram changes in five (3%) patients.
Defibrillation is a common treatment for life-threatening cardiac dysrhythmias and ventricular fibrillation.
This procedure helps diagnose cardiovascular diseases such as pulmonary embolism, cardiac murmurs, myocardial infarction, and cardiac dysrhythmias.
Patients were extubated and shifted to recovery and monitored for an hour for adverse effects such as bradycardia, hypotension, dysrhythmias, respiratory depression (arterial oxygen saturation less than 95) and sedation.
Specialists primarily from Massachusetts General Hospital cover general principles like monitoring, airway management, nutrition, and transport, and specific considerations like cardiac dysrhythmias, acute kidney injury, acute weakness, acute gastrointestinal diseases, infectious diseases, endocrine disorders and glucose management, resuscitation, burn critical care, and transfusion medicine.
Beta-blockers, such as atenolol (Tenormin) and propranolol (Inderal), are used to treat hypertension, cardiac dysrhythmias and angina, as well as migraine and essential tremor.
The Milner Acetylcholine Protocol (MAP) for Management of Cardiac Dysrhythmias, by Jeremy Mikolai, ND, and Martin Milner, ND
Maternal dysrhythmias, nausea and vomiting: 19 patients in group ph experienced dysrhythmias (2 patients showed tachycardia and 17 showed bradycardia), but only 3 among the 17 patients, HR reached below 50/min and returned to normal only after one dose Atropine (0.