dysteleology

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dys·tel·e·ol·o·gy

(dĭs-tĕl′ē-ŏl′ə-jē, -tē′lē-)
n.
1. The doctrine of purposelessness in nature.
2. Purposelessness in structures of living bodies, as manifested by the existence of vestigial or nonfunctional organs or parts.

dys·tel′e·o·log′i·cal (-ə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl) adj.
dys·tel′e·ol′o·gist n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

dysteleology

(ˌdɪstɛlɪˈɒlədʒɪ; -tiːlɪ-)
n
(Philosophy) philosophy the denial of purpose in life. Compare teleology
dysˌteleoˈlogical adj
ˌdysteleˈologist n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

dysteleology

a doctrine denying the existence of a final cause or purpose in life or nature. Cf. teleology.dysteleologist, n.dysteleological, adj.
See also: Philosophy
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
For example, the term evolution may refer to teleological evolution (a purposeful and designed process) or a dysteleological evolution (a process devoid of purpose and driven by chance only), that is, the basic molecules to humans theory.
Through her creative dynamism, Sophia enters into creation and its creatures, producing friends of God and prophets against dysteleological suffering and death within the cosmos.
To continue with shorthand analogies, it is possible to make the following statement about memetics: Memetics is a Darwinian dysteleological theory of culture and mind that is often forced to use teleological language to describe what it claims to be non-teleological processes and events.
Tennyson employs this Miltonic allusion for primarily dysteleological purposes.
(20) In other words, Darwin is definitely not embracing the dysteleological worldview of Dawkins.
It is important to underline that this view of evolution is not the dysteleological process assumed by Richard Dawkins.
Darwinism is a problematic term since it is often skewed to carry metaphysical implications of atheism or of a dysteleological universe--notions to which Darwin never ascribed.