dystocia


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dystocia

(dɪsˈtəʊʃə)
n
(Gynaecology & Obstetrics) med abnormal, slow, or difficult childbirth, usually because of disordered or ineffective contractions of the uterus
[New Latin, from Greek, from dus- (see dys-) + tokos childbirth + -ia]
dysˈtocial adj
Translations

dys·to·ci·a

n. distocia, parto difícil, laborioso.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The first CAE LucinaAR learning module will provide immediate visual and physiological feedback on the effectiveness of evidence-based clinical emergency measures to resolve shoulder dystocia.
During vaginal delivery, a shoulder dystocia was encountered.
sup][1] As advised by Hart in 1997, by waiting for a contraction after the head is delivered, the incidence of shoulder dystocia was reduced dramatically.
Shoulder dystocia occurs when after delivery of the foetal head; the baby's anterior shoulder gets stuck behind the mother's pubic bone.
ATLANTA -- Implementation of evidence-based practice bundles was associated with significant reductions in shoulder dystocia, brachial plexus injury, and operative vaginal delivery in a large multicenter hospital system.
As a person who has lived in Metro Manila all his life, Bong Banal of indie band Dystocia Curve admits that his great love for Manila is now profoundly challenged by what he considers a deterioration in the quality of life.
Dystocia is difficulty in giving birth at time of parturition which occurs mainly due to maternal or fetal causes (Ekstrand and Linde-Forsberg, 1994).
5 pluriparous buffalo with dystocia due to malformed fetus was presented at Theriogenology clinic.
Shoulder dystocia (SD) is defined as a prolonged head-to-body delivery time of more than 60 seconds or the need for ancillary obstetric manoeuvres.
We here describe a case of six-year-old pregnant buffalo with dystocia due to the dead dicephalic malformed fetus which was presented at Theriogenology Clinic.
Dystocia is defined as slow progression or lack of progression of labor which occurs in 25-30% of nulliparous women and is regarded as the cause for two thirds of cesarean sections in these women.
7 The short term complications of excess infant birth weight are shoulder dystocia and infant hypoglycemia.