dystopia

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dys·to·pi·a

 (dĭs-tō′pē-ə)
n.
1. An imaginary place or state in which the condition of life is extremely bad, as from deprivation, oppression, or terror.
2. A work describing such a place or state: "dystopias such as Brave New World" (Times Literary Supplement).

dystopia

(dɪsˈtəʊpɪə)
n
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) an imaginary place where everything is as bad as it can be
[C19 (coined by John Stuart Mill): from dys- + Utopia]
dysˈtopian adj, n

dys•to•pi•a

(dɪsˈtoʊ pi ə)

n., pl. -pi•as.
an imaginary society in which social or technological trends have culminated in a greatly diminished quality of life or degradation of values. Compare Utopia.
[1865–70; dys- + (U)topia]
dys•to′pi•an, adj.

dystopia

an imaginary place where the conditions and quality of life are unpleasant. The opposite of Utopia.
See also: Utopia
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dystopia - state in which the conditions of life are extremely bad as from deprivation or oppression or terror
state - the way something is with respect to its main attributes; "the current state of knowledge"; "his state of health"; "in a weak financial state"
utopia - ideally perfect state; especially in its social and political and moral aspects
2.dystopia - a work of fiction describing an imaginary place where life is extremely bad because of deprivation or oppression or terror
fiction - a literary work based on the imagination and not necessarily on fact
Translations
DystopieGegenutopieMätopieAnti-Utopie
dystopia
distopia

dystopia

nDystopie f
References in periodicals archive ?
Readers will better enjoy one of the many better done dystopians out there, such as James Dashner's trilogy The Maze Runner, Joelle Charbonneau's The Testing series, or Veronica Roth's Divergent.
The Burnouts paints a graphic picture of a dystopian society.
Rather than represent the revolutionary tendencies of capitalism and technology, dystopians portray a historical collapse, a regression to an era-often conceived in Jeffersonian terms-which is pre-industrial, pre-immigrant, and pre-urban.
A subset of novels within this body of Afrikaans works that display disillusionment with post-apartheid South Africa are dystopian Afrikaans novels set in a future beyond the time of publication.
However, in investigating characteristics of the Afrikaans dystopian futurist novels published after 1999 it becomes apparent that the past is also an important premise in the visions of the future that is created (compare Barendse, "Geskiedenis, geheue, verantwoordelikheid" and "Die miskruier, hoop en die verlede").
The radical dystopians cited above view institutionalized schooling as necessarily detrimental to individual autonomy, democratic praxis, and intellectual development.
Though some nineteenth-century authors made use of dystopian themes in their writings, dystopian literature is largely a product of the twentieth century, with the number of titles published increasing with each passing decade.
Of particular interest here are the hyperbolic flourishes that cast the President as a character taken directly from a dystopian novel, as menacing and dangerous as Orwell's Big Brother himself.
Orwell, Huxley, and other dystopians understood that technology wedded to unaccountable power amplifies human weaknesses -- resulting in terror, mass bloodshed, and despotism.
Conspiracy folklore does the same thing for the same reason, except that most of these dystopians actually believe in the worlds they've invented.