earache

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ear·ache

 (îr′āk′)
n.
Pain in the ear; otalgia.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

earache

(ˈɪərˌeɪk)
n
(Pathology) pain in the middle or inner ear. Technical name: otalgia Compare otitis
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ear•ache

(ˈɪərˌeɪk)

n.
a pain or ache in the ear; otalgia.
[1650–60]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

earache

Any pain in the ear, most often caused by an infection of the middle ear.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.earache - an ache localized in the middle or inner earearache - an ache localized in the middle or inner ear
ache, aching - a dull persistent (usually moderately intense) pain
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
bolest ucha
ørepine
korvasärky
uhobolja
fülfájás
eyrnaverkur
mal d’orecchiemal d'orecchi
耳の痛み
귀앓이
bolesť v uchu
bolečina v ušesu
öronvärk
หูเจ็บ
đau tai

earache

[ˈɪəreɪk] Ndolor m de oídos
to have earachetener dolor de oídos
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

earache

[ˈɪəreɪk] nmal m d'oreille(s)
to have earache → avoir mal à l'oreille, avoir mal aux oreilles
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

earache

[ˈɪərˌeɪk] nmal m d'orecchi
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

ear1

() noun
1. the part of the head by means of which we hear, or its external part only. Her new hair-style covers her ears.
2. the sense or power of hearing especially the ability to hear the difference between sounds. sharp ears; He has a good ear for music.
ˈearache noun
pain in the inner part of the ear.
ˈeardrum noun
the layer of tissue separating the inner from the outer ear.
ˈearlobe noun
the soft lower part of the ear.
ˈearmark verb
to set aside (for a particular purpose). This money is earmarked for our holiday.
ˈearring noun
an ornament worn attached to the ear. silver earrings.
ˈearshot noun
the distance at which sound can be heard. He did not hear her last remark as he was out of earshot.
be all ears
to listen with keen attention. The children were all ears when their father was describing the car crash.
go in one ear and out the other
not to make any lasting impression. I keep telling that child to work harder but my words go in one ear and out the other.
play by ear
to play (music) without looking at and without having memorized printed music.
up to one's ears (in)
deeply involved (in). I'm up to my ears in work.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

earache

أَلَمُ الُأذُن bolest ucha ørepine Ohrenschmerzen πόνος στο αφτί dolor de oídos korvasärky otite uhobolja mal d’orecchie 耳の痛み 귀앓이 oorpijn øreverk ból ucha dor de ouvido, dor de ouvidos боль в ухе öronvärk หูเจ็บ kulak ağrısı đau tai 耳痛
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009

ear·ache

n. dolor de oído.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
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"Tell me, Lamp-Wick, dear friend, have you ever suffered from an earache?"
In consequence of a cold, she caught a sore throat; and some time later she had an earache. Three years later she was stone deaf, and spoke in a very loud voice even in church.
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"The reason there is such a wait is because the ER has a lot of nonemergency issues to deal with," she says, such as the common cold, earaches, and sprains.
The title of my book--Salt in Your Sock--came from an Italian grandmother who had a surefire remedy that she had used to treat her children's and grandchildren's earaches. Her recipe, shared with me decades ago, called for heating a cup of coarse sea salt in a frying pan.
Taking care of their earaches and heartaches and broken bones and disappointments, paying for their college and dance classes and car insurance--they've been a burden.
With all seasonal changes, we are more prone to develop various symptoms, including those of "colds" and "flu"--fatigue, nasal drips and obstruction, sneezing, coughing, sore throats, earaches, headache, sinusitis, bronchitis, diarrhea, etc.
Greene is alleging that the exposure to the mold growth inside the vehicle subsequently caused him to suffer a variety of complaints, including sinus and respiratory problems, migraine headaches, earaches, tremors, dizziness, fatigue, and memory loss.