earcon


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earcon

(ˈɪərˌkɒn)
n
(Communications & Information) a short, organized sound sequence that stands for an object or an incident
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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The paper mentions two well-established auditory interfaces design methods: the "auditory icon" and the "earcon" [11].
Brewster, "Understanding Concurrent Earcons: Applying Auditory Scene Analysis Principles to Concurrent Earcon Recognition," ACM Transactions on Applied Perception, vol.
Companies agreeing to follow the "GetHuman Standard" guidelines--which include allowing callers to press "0" or say "operator" to reach a live person, and to press "#" or say "'repeat" to replay a menu--will play a special tone, or "earcon," at the beginning of the call, signaling to consumers that the company is in compliance.
Auditory Earcon icon (pitch, Auditory (pitch, Objects and pan, icon pan, actions Voice repeat) (pitch) repeat) Player jump X Player land Numbers X Player walk X Floating platform Sound bite X Solid platform Sound bite X End-of-platform X warning Pit X Bees X Dogs X
The auditory stimuli were continuous 3D binaural sounds synthesized with nonindividualized HRTFs from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) dataset (Gardner & Martin, 2000), auditory icons (sounds that create an analogy with real-world events and situations), and "earcons" (abstract, symbolic sounds used to facilitate the players' navigation through the complex content of the game) (Csapo and Wersenyi, 2013).
They placed Earcons (nonverbal audio message which uses an abstract mapping to provide information to the user) at specific positions of landmarks of this park.
Alternatively, Bennett (2002) creates the "Kevin System" that uses "earcons" (the audio equivalent of an icon), positioning presentation and verbal descriptions to convey the information about the hierarchy of symbols, and the content represented therein.
Most recent research on auditory displays has focused on 3-D localization of auditory objects (Nelson et al., 1998) or the design of discrete auditory icons, or earcons (Gaver, 1997), which are not necessarily always appropriate for monitoring.
Sound: Speech input and output, music, and a wide variety of acoustic cues, including realistic sounds (so-called earcons) supplement and/or replace visual communication [7].