earwig


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ear·wig

 (îr′wĭg′)
n.
Any of various elongate insects of the order Dermaptera, having a pair of usually pincerlike appendages protruding from the rear of the abdomen. Also called dermapteran.
tr.v. ear·wigged, ear·wig·ging, ear·wigs
To attempt to influence by persistent confidential argument or talk.

[Middle English erwig, from Old English ēarwicga : ēare, ear; see ear1 + wicga, insect; see wegh- in Indo-European roots.]
Word History: According to a widespread folk tradition, earwigs enter the ears of sleeping people and burrow into their brains, eating a network of tunnels through the head and even leaving their eggs to hatch within the skull. In fact, this belief is completely false. An earwig, being a creature that prefers moist dark places, may very, very rarely find its way into the human ear, but it will not eat through the eardrum. Earwigs eat a variety of plants, insects, and decaying organic matter, not human flesh. But the folk belief in the deadly earwig is very old and has remained persistent. An Old English text of around ad 1000 even includes a remedy with ēarwicgan, "against earwigs," in which a thick blade of grass or straw is used to drive the earwig out of the ear. The Modern English word earwig itself descends from Old English ēarwicga, a compound of ēar, "ear," and wicga, a word denoting some kind of insect, and this compound obviously reflects the folk tradition about the earwig's horrific habits. The second part of the compound, wicga, is no doubt a member of the same family of words that includes the Modern English verbs wiggle (from or akin to the Middle Low German wiggelen) and wag (from Middle English waggen). This group of terms denotes quick movements of various sorts, and the prehistoric ancestor of the Old English word wicga probably meant something like "wiggler."

earwig

(ˈɪəˌwɪɡ)
n
(Animals) any of various insects of the order Dermaptera, esp Forficula auricularia (common European earwig), which typically have an elongated body with small leathery forewings, semicircular membranous hindwings, and curved forceps at the tip of the abdomen
vb, -wigs, -wigging or -wigged
1. informal to eavesdrop
2. (tr) archaic to attempt to influence (a person) by private insinuation
[Old English ēarwicga, from ēare ear1 + wicga beetle, insect; probably from a superstition that the insect crept into human ears]

ear•wig

(ˈɪərˌwɪg)

n., v. -wigged, -wig•ging. n.
1. any of numerous dark and slender nocturnal insects of the order Dermaptera, having horny pincers at the rear that can rise up like a scorpion's.
v.t.
2. to fill the mind of with prejudice by insinuations.
[before 1000; Middle English erwigge, Old English ēarwicga=ēar ear1 + wicga earwig]

earwig


Past participle: earwigged
Gerund: earwigging

Imperative
earwig
earwig
Present
I earwig
you earwig
he/she/it earwigs
we earwig
you earwig
they earwig
Preterite
I earwigged
you earwigged
he/she/it earwigged
we earwigged
you earwigged
they earwigged
Present Continuous
I am earwigging
you are earwigging
he/she/it is earwigging
we are earwigging
you are earwigging
they are earwigging
Present Perfect
I have earwigged
you have earwigged
he/she/it has earwigged
we have earwigged
you have earwigged
they have earwigged
Past Continuous
I was earwigging
you were earwigging
he/she/it was earwigging
we were earwigging
you were earwigging
they were earwigging
Past Perfect
I had earwigged
you had earwigged
he/she/it had earwigged
we had earwigged
you had earwigged
they had earwigged
Future
I will earwig
you will earwig
he/she/it will earwig
we will earwig
you will earwig
they will earwig
Future Perfect
I will have earwigged
you will have earwigged
he/she/it will have earwigged
we will have earwigged
you will have earwigged
they will have earwigged
Future Continuous
I will be earwigging
you will be earwigging
he/she/it will be earwigging
we will be earwigging
you will be earwigging
they will be earwigging
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been earwigging
you have been earwigging
he/she/it has been earwigging
we have been earwigging
you have been earwigging
they have been earwigging
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been earwigging
you will have been earwigging
he/she/it will have been earwigging
we will have been earwigging
you will have been earwigging
they will have been earwigging
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been earwigging
you had been earwigging
he/she/it had been earwigging
we had been earwigging
you had been earwigging
they had been earwigging
Conditional
I would earwig
you would earwig
he/she/it would earwig
we would earwig
you would earwig
they would earwig
Past Conditional
I would have earwigged
you would have earwigged
he/she/it would have earwigged
we would have earwigged
you would have earwigged
they would have earwigged
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.earwig - any of numerous insects of the order Dermaptera having elongate bodies and slender many-jointed antennae and a pair of large pincers at the rear of the abdomenearwig - any of numerous insects of the order Dermaptera having elongate bodies and slender many-jointed antennae and a pair of large pincers at the rear of the abdomen
insect - small air-breathing arthropod
Dermaptera, order Dermaptera - earwigs and a few related forms
common European earwig, Forficula auricularia - sometimes destructive to cultivated bulbs
Translations
دُويبَة أبو مَقَص
škvor
ørentvist
OhrwurmOhrenkriecherOhrkneifer
forfikulo
pihtihäntäinen
fülbemászó
klaufhali, eyrnapadda
挟み虫
집게벌레
auslinda
spīļaste
ucholak
strižavkauholaža
tvestjärt
แมงคาเรือง
kulağakaçan böceği

earwig

[ˈɪəwɪg] Ntijereta f

earwig

[ˈɪərwɪg] nperce-oreille m

earwig

[ˈɪəˌwɪg] n (insect) → forbicina

earwig

(ˈiəwig) noun
a kind of insect with pincers at the end of its body.
References in classic literature ?
Earwig had a wash at home, and one of her children had fallen into the hot copper, for which reason she was running so fast to fetch the doctor.
There was an inhospitable smell in the room, of cold soot and hot dust; and, as I looked up into the corners of the tester over my head, I thought what a number of blue-bottle flies from the butchers', and earwigs from the market, and grubs from the country, must be holding on up there, lying by for next summer.
They sat on a bench, and he had really made up his mind that here was his opportunity when Miss Wilkinson said she was sure there were earwigs and insisted on moving.
Jane Dibabs--the Dibabses lived in the beautiful little thatched white house one story high, covered all over with ivy and creeping plants, with an exquisite little porch with twining honysuckles and all sorts of things: where the earwigs used to fall into one's tea on a summer evening, and always fell upon their backs and kicked dreadfully, and where the frogs used to get into the rushlight shades when one stopped all night, and sit up and look through the little holes like Christians--Jane Dibabs, SHE married a man who was a great deal older than herself, and WOULD marry him, notwithstanding all that could be said to the contrary, and she was so fond of him that nothing was ever equal to it.
they cried, holding and clutching and slipping, while the silent scared earwigs and little spiders twisted between their legs.
He has a philanthropic motive for coming to smoke his cigar in our porch on summer evenings; he says he does it to kill the earwigs amongst the roses, with which insects, but for his benevolent fumigations, he intimates we should certainly be overrun.
He performs under his poetry alter ego, Earwig, and has been performing on the Liverpool and north west poetry scene for more than four years.
Pot shot at earwigs Protect emerging dahlia and chrysanthemum flowers from earwig damage by putting an upturned plant pot filled with straw on a cane set between the flower heads.
Make earwig traps by filling a small plastic pot with dampened straw and placing it upside down on top of a cane at a similar height to the plants you want to protect.
Make earwig traps by filling small plastic pot with dampened straw and placing it upside down on top of a cane at a similar height to the plants you want to protect.
Martin Hughes-Games said he had fond memories with the broadcaster, adding: "I made a programme with David and it was about an earwig.
Sadly, he was just too late to save these insects from extinction, and all he found were earwig remains with tell-tale mouse toothmarks Head of science John Catherall with his winning class of third year pupils in 1986.