earwitness

ear·wit·ness

 (îr′wĭt′nĭs)
n.
A person who has heard someone or something and can bear witness to the fact.

earwitness

(ˈɪərˌwɪtnɪs)
n
1.
a. a person who gives evidence or information about something heard rather than seen
b. (as modifier): earwitness reports.
2. (as modifier): earwitness reports.
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References in periodicals archive ?
In its nomination, the Turner Prize jury highlighted Abu Hamdan's video installation "Walled Unwalled," 2018, his solo exhibition "Earwitness Theater" at London's Chisenhale Gallery (Sept.
Abu Hamdan was shortlisted for his solo exhibition "Earwitness Theatre" and for the video installation "Walled Unwalled: and performance After SFX at Tate Modern, London.
The lectures, the latest in Hamdan's series of live audio essays, examine the contemporary politics of listening and the importance of the 'earwitness'.
To "earwitness" is to attempt to "hear within history [as it unfolds], through an extended ear" (LaBelle, 2010, p.
For example, as an earwitness in the NICU, I realized the physiological monitors and ventilators directly made noises and sounds; however, the automated medication dispensing system indirectly required speech sounds via a hospital policy regulating its use.
The term "earwitness" is meant to encapsulate these observations and connect them to the burden of feeling in Barnes's work.
A 2016 investigation of the notorious Saydnaya military prison in Syria, conducted in collaboration with Amnesty International, entailed a shift from eyewitness to "earwitness" testimony.
Also, further empirical examination of the impact of the approach adopted here on the users of transcripts, including the translator as an 'expert earwitness', would demonstrate the relevance of the procedure to the justice system.
The most fully realized of the Kerouac essays is "Earwitness Testimony: Sound and Sense, Word and Void in Jack Kerouac's Old Angel Midnight," which, interestingly, is the only essay in the collection that cites previous Beat scholarship.
We conducted an empirical legal analysis concerning cases that involved voice identification (earwitness testimony) as evidence.
(188) Specifically, there does not appear to be a consistent application of these terms, despite the fact that they are integral to both general earwitness performance and to admissibility determinations in the case of 'experts'.
He deals insightfully with Elizabeth I, whom he calls the "paradigmatic earwitness of the period" (23), Francis Bacon, and humanist education theorists such as Juan Luis Vives and Roger Ascham.