eased


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ease

 (ēz)
n.
1. The condition of being comfortable or relieved.
2.
a. Freedom from pain, worry, or agitation: Her mind was at ease knowing that the children were safe.
b. Freedom from constraint or embarrassment; naturalness.
3.
a. Freedom from difficulty, hardship, or effort: rose through the ranks with apparent ease.
b. Readiness or dexterity in performance; facility: a pianist who played the sonata with ease.
4. Freedom from financial difficulty; affluence: a life of luxury and ease.
5. A state of rest, relaxation, or leisure: He took his ease by the pond.
v. eased, eas·ing, eas·es
v.tr.
1. To free from pain, worry, or agitation: eased his conscience by returning the stolen money.
2.
a. To lessen the discomfort or pain of: shifted position to ease her back.
b. To alleviate; assuage: prescribed a drug to ease the pain.
3. To give respite from: eased the staff's burden by hiring more people.
4. To slacken the strain, pressure, or tension of; loosen: ease off a cable.
5. To reduce the difficulty or trouble of: eased the entrance requirements.
6. To move or maneuver slowly and carefully: eased the car into a narrow space; eased the director out of office.
v.intr.
1. To lessen, as in discomfort, pressure, or stress: pain that never eased.
2. To move or proceed with little effort: eased through life doing as little as possible.
Idiom:
at ease
1. In a relaxed position, especially standing silently at rest with the right foot stationary: put the soldiers at ease while waiting for inspection.
2. Used as a command for troops to assume a relaxed position.

[Middle English ese, from Old French aise, elbowroom, physical comfort, from Vulgar Latin *adiacēs, adiac-*adiac-, alteration of Latin adiacēns, adiacent-, present participle of adiacēre, to lie near; see adjacent.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.eased - (of pain or sorrow) made easier to beareased - (of pain or sorrow) made easier to bear
mitigated - made less severe or intense; "he gladly accepted the mitigated penalty"
References in classic literature ?
Sophia was very soon eased of her causeless fright by the entry of the noble peer, who was not only an intimate acquaintance of Mrs Fitzpatrick, but in reality a very particular friend of that lady.
He further said that there are millions of people whose business have finished, adding that, "until their business is eased, there is no question of ease of doing business.