eastern red cedar


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eastern red cedar

n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.eastern red cedar - small juniper found east of Rocky Mountains having a conic crown, brown bark that peels in shreds, and small sharp needleseastern red cedar - small juniper found east of Rocky Mountains having a conic crown, brown bark that peels in shreds, and small sharp needles
pencil cedar, pencil cedar tree - any of several junipers with wood suitable for making pencils
References in periodicals archive ?
This disease requires eastern red cedar (Juniperus virginiana) as an alternate host, so avoid planting this plant if you have hawthorns in your garden.
STILLWATER For the past two years, Oklahoma State University environmental science major Rainee DeRoin has monitored seven small watersheds, including lands that have eastern red cedar, prairie and switchgrass, at OSU's 1,820-acre Cross Timbers Experimental Range southwest of Stillwater as part of a long-running research study.
If you're looking for something quick-growing, consider the eastern red cedar (Juniperus virginiana), which can grow 1 to 2 feet in height per year.
LEYLAND CYPRESS--Leyland cypress can be used as a substitute for Eastern red cedar. It is softer and not as prone to dry out as the cedar.
Two plant-based aromatics--sweet-scented "rose" geranium (Pelargonium graveolens) essential oil and eastern red cedar (Juniperus virginiana; also known as "red cedarwood") essential oil--were repeatedly recommended by readers who use them as spray-on repellents for pets and family members alike.
Structures were constructed from either eastern red cedar, pine trees, hardwood tree tops, rocks, or stumps.
Some tree species, such as the American chestnut, black locust, most cedars, and eastern red cedar (a juniper) are naturally rot resistant, but their sapwood (particularly white cedar) may rot.
In 1991, the Arkansas Natural Heritage Commission and The Nature Conservancy began acquiring land in one of the better of those areas near Arkadelphia in Clark County, Arkansas (habitat described by Warriner, 2004), and began restoration through controlled burns and removal of eastern red cedar (Juniperus virginiana).
But I'm puzzled by the statement that Eastern red cedar (Juniperus virginiana) "kills insects, birds, and even mammals."
Outcroppings of the basin's Ordovician limestone bedrock and shallow soils result in conditions that favor herbaceous vegetation and limit tree growth to isolated individuals or scattered stands of eastern red cedar (Juniperus virginiana) and a few other woody species.

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