eave


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eave

(iːv)
adj
(Architecture) relating to the eaves of a building
vb (tr)
(Architecture) to give cover or protection under the eaves of a building

eave

(iv)

n.
Usu., eaves. the overhanging lower edge of a roof.
[before 1000; Middle English eves, Old English efes, c. Old High German obisa eave trough, Gothic ubizwa portico; probably akin to above, over]
eaved, adj.
References in classic literature ?
They brought her back to her unhappy father, and questioned her as to her misfortune, and she confessed without pressure that Vicente de la Roca had deceived her, and under promise of marrying her had induced her to leave her father's house, as he meant to take her to the richest and most delightful city in the whole world, which was Naples; and that she, ill-advised and deluded, had believed him, and robbed her father, and handed over all to him the night she disappeared; and that he had carried her away to a rugged mountain and shut her up in the eave where they had found her.
Nor learn that tempted Fate will eave the loftiest Star.
Trillium Covert," they read, in quaint carved letters under the eave of the porch.
There was the old gray house with its sloping eaves.
The house was big enough for a hotel; it was a hundred feet long and fifty wide, and ten feet high, from ground to eaves; but from the eaves to the comb of the mighty roof was as much as forty feet, or maybe even more.
And the old lame horse in the stable was glad to see him; and so were the swallows who had already built their nests under the eaves of his roof and had young ones.
I stepped over the great western gate, and passed very gently, and sidling, through the two principal streets, only in my short waistcoat, for fear of damaging the roofs and eaves of the houses with the skirts of my coat.
The fact that Barsoomian architecture is extremely ornate made the feat much simpler than I had anticipated, since I found ornamental ledges and projections which fairly formed a perfect ladder for me all the way to the eaves of the building.
I climbed the barren mountain, And my gaze swept far and wide For the red-lit eaves of my father's home, And I fancied that he sighed: My son has gone for a soldier, For a soldier night and day; But my son is wise, and may yet return, When the drums have died away.
It was like sitting in a swallow's nest under the eaves of the roof of the world.
BENEATH the vine-clad eaves, Whose shadows fall before Thy lowly cottage door Under the lilac's tremulous leaves-- Within thy snowy claspeèd hand The purple flowers it bore.
Long thatched sheds stretched round the enclosure, their slopes encrusted with vivid green moss, and their eaves supported by wooden posts rubbed to a glossy smoothness by the flanks of infinite cows and calves of bygone years, now passed to an oblivion almost inconceivable in its profundity.