ecchymosis


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ec·chy·mo·sis

 (ĕk′ĭ-mō′sĭs)
n.
The passage of blood from ruptured blood vessels into subcutaneous tissue, marked by a purple discoloration of the skin.

[New Latin, from Greek ekkhumōsis, extravasation, from ekkhumousthai, to extravasate : ek-, out; see ecto- + khumos, juice; see gheu- in Indo-European roots.]

ec′chy·mot′ic (-mŏt′ĭk) adj.

ecchymosis

(ˌɛkɪˈməʊsɪs)
n, pl -ses (-siːz)
(Pathology) discoloration of the skin through bruising
[C16: from New Latin, from Greek ekkhumōsis, from ekkhumousthai to pour out, from khumos juice]
ecchymosed, ecchymotic adj

ec•chy•mo•sis

(ˌɛk əˈmoʊ sɪs)

n., pl. -ses (-sēz).
a discoloration of the skin due to extravasation of blood, as in a bruise.
[1535–45; < New Latin < Greek ekchýmōsis=ekchȳmō-, variant s. of ekchȳmoûsthai to become extravasated (ek- ec- + -chȳmoûsthai, v. derivative of chȳmós juice, humor) + -sis -sis]
ec`chy•mot′ic (-ˈmɒt ɪk) adj.

ecchymosis

1. the secretion of blood from a blood vessel into the surrounding tissue as a result of a bruise.
2. the bruise or discoloration thus caused.
See also: Blood and Blood Vessels
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ecchymosis - the purple or black-and-blue area resulting from a bruise
bruise, contusion - an injury that doesn't break the skin but results in some discoloration
2.ecchymosis - the escape of blood from ruptured blood vessels into the surrounding tissue to form a purple or black-and-blue spot on the skin
biological process, organic process - a process occurring in living organisms
Translations
ekchymóza
ihonalainenverenvuoto

ec·chy·mo·sis

n. equimosis, pop. morado, moratón;
cambio de color de la piel de azulado a verde debido a extravasación de sangre en el tejido subcutáneo celular;
hematoma.
References in periodicals archive ?
Initial examination of the wound revealed a large ecchymosis and severe local swelling.
3,6) There may be signs of inflammation, tenderness, and ecchymosis near the site of injury.
16] We observed bruises and ecchymosis were the most common initial presentation.
On day 3 after his Mohs procedure, one 73-year-old man taking ibrutinib for Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia developed extensive bilateral periorbital ecchymosis that extended down to his upper chest.
The patient had stiffness of the pectoral muscles, and petechiation and ecchymosis noted around the eyes and beneath the mandible.
Her fever increased and cutaneous lesions evolved to hemorrhages and ecchymosis in both hands and feet.
Complications were only mild with reports of ecchymosis in three patients, while five patients had mild blepharoptosis readily reversed with hyaluronidase.
Soft-tissue injury, irregularities of bony structures, postoperative edema, ecchymosis, and nasal obstruction may occur as a result of osteotomy.
Patients usually present with some combination of epistaxis, edema, laceration, instability, crepitation, ecchymosis, and deformity; however, these physical findings may not always be present and are often fading (5).
His abdominal examination revealed distension with ecchymosis in the left lower quadrant (fig-1).
For 1 patient, severe complications progressively emerged 6 days after disease onset and included pneumonia and hydrothorax (online Technical Appendix Figure), confusion, meningeal irritation sign, ecchymosis, and hematuria.
People enrolled in this study included those attending two hospitals in Meta from May 2013 to June 2014 with a documented temperature >38 [degrees]C for a maximum of seven days, accompanied by one or more of the following signs and symptoms: headache, myalgia, ocular pain, abdominal pain, arthralgia, generalized fatigue, cough, nausea or vomiting, sore throat, rhinorrhea, dyspnea, diarrhea, jaundice, dizziness, rash, ecchymosis, epistaxis, or gingival bleeding.