ecclesiological


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Related to ecclesiological: Ecclesiologists

ec·cle·si·ol·o·gy

 (ĭ-klē′zē-ŏl′ə-jē)
n.
1. The branch of theology that is concerned with the nature, constitution, and functions of a church.
2. The study of ecclesiastical architecture and ornamentation.


ec·cle′si·o·log′i·cal (-ə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl) adj.
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As a practitioner's guide, the book does not develop the hermeneutical and ecclesiological justifications for making the practices of Israel paradigmatic for the Christian church, though the endnotes point to some of the sources related to these deeper matters.
This is particularly true of the early stages of the post-Vatican-II period, which was characterized by a strong ecclesiological focus on the reforms of the Second Vatican Council.
Many other great Biblical figures, like Prophet Jeremiah, remained unmarried.Priestly celibacy has also great ecclesiological significance.
Another 30 papers cover African theologies past and present; Christianity and Reformation in today's Germany and Europe; translating and interpreting the Bible in the African and European contexts: theological and ecclesiological challenges; cultures encountering Christianity: traditional religions and philosophies; diversity and pluralism: Christianity in a changing landscape; sola gratia, sola fide: faith, love, and men's works; leadership, discipleship, and priesthood for all; creation theology and ethics of sustainability; ecclesiologies, theologies, and gender parity; and future perspectives.
Scholars and pastors devoted to serious ecclesiological projects will find this small book valuable both historically and theologically.
3), the decree formulated the ecumenical consequences of the new articulation of the ecclesiological self-understanding of the Roman Catholic Church in the Dogmatic Constitution on the Church (Rumen Gentium).
But in this issue of MQR I offer an initial survey of attitudes and practices in the global Anabaptist-Mennonite fellowship regarding one particular marker of ecclesiological identity--a commitment to the gospel of peace in its many and varied expressions.
Using this volume in the classroom will clarify for readers that Orthodox theologians, by reacting to ecclesiological developments related with Vatican I and Vatican II, developed their own Orthodox ecclesiology.
(2) As the title indicates, the task of this essay is to assess Staniloae's understanding of the intratrinitarian relationship between the Son and the Holy Spirit and its significance for the ecclesiological synthesis between Christology and pneumatology.
From an ecclesiological view, such a task requires a re-imagining of the visible unity of the Church, including differences, localities and contexts.
The Questionnaire itself had three distinct parts: A was Ecclesiological (pertaining to the internal functioning of the church); B was on Moral and Ethical issues; and C was on Sociological issues or Temporal Affairs.
The first covers the period from 1957, the beginning of F&O in the United States, to 1971, dealing with regional aspects such as the characteristics of the United States as an immigrant nation, the ecclesiological significance of councils of churches, sociopolitical and gender contexts, and local ecumenism.