echidna


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e·chid·na

 (ĭ-kĭd′nə)
n.
Any of several nocturnal burrowing egg-laying mammals of the genera Tachyglossus and Zaglossus of Australia, Tasmania, and New Guinea, having a spiny coat, a slender snout, and an extensible sticky tongue used for catching insects. Also called spiny anteater.

[Latin, adder, viper, from Greek ekhidna, from ekhis.]

echidna

(ɪˈkɪdnə)
n, pl -nas or -nae (-niː)
(Animals) any of the spine-covered monotreme mammals of the genera Tachyglossus of Australia and Zaglossus of New Guinea: family Tachyglossidae. They have a long snout and claws for hunting ants and termites. Also called: spiny anteater
[C19: from New Latin, from Latin: viper, from Greek ekhidna]

e•chid•na

(ɪˈkɪd nə)

n., pl. -nas.
any long-snouted, spiny, insectivorous monotreme of the family Tachyglossidae, of Australia, Tasmania, and New Guinea.
Also called spiny anteater.
[< New Latin (1798), orig. a genus name; Latin: serpent, Echidna (a mythical creature that gave birth to the Hydra and other monsters) < Greek échidna, akin to échis viper]

e·chid·na

(ĭ-kĭd′nə)
Either of two burrowing, egg-laying mammals having a spiny coat, slender snout, and long sticky tongue used for catching ants and termites. Echidnas are toothless and have claws used for digging. They are found in Australia, Tasmania, and New Guinea.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.echidna - a burrowing monotreme mammal covered with spines and having a long snout and claws for hunting ants and termitesechidna - a burrowing monotreme mammal covered with spines and having a long snout and claws for hunting ants and termites; native to New Guinea
egg-laying mammal, monotreme - the most primitive mammals comprising the only extant members of the subclass Prototheria
genus Zaglossus, Zaglossus - a genus of Tachyglossidae
2.echidna - a burrowing monotreme mammal covered with spines and having a long snout and claws for hunting ants and termitesechidna - a burrowing monotreme mammal covered with spines and having a long snout and claws for hunting ants and termites; native to Australia
egg-laying mammal, monotreme - the most primitive mammals comprising the only extant members of the subclass Prototheria
genus Tachyglossus, Tachyglossus - type genus of the family Tachyglossidae
Translations
myrepindsvin
AmeisenigelEchidna
nokkasiili
mjónefur
echidna
mierenegel
maurpinnsvin
myrpiggsvin
References in classic literature ?
295-305) And in a hollow cave she bare another monster, irresistible, in no wise like either to mortal men or to the undying gods, even the goddess fierce Echidna who is half a nymph with glancing eyes and fair cheeks, and half again a huge snake, great and awful, with speckled skin, eating raw flesh beneath the secret parts of the holy earth.
Her did Pegasus and noble Bellerophon slay; but Echidna was subject in love to Orthus and brought forth the deadly Sphinx which destroyed the Cadmeans, and the Nemean lion, which Hera, the good wife of Zeus, brought up and made to haunt the hills of Nemea, a plague to men.
At least 450 species of bird, mammals and reptiles, including the black palm cockatoos and Echidna, were recovered.
Visit angleseagolfclub.com.au 2 STROKE AN ECHIDNA AT HEALESVILLE SANCTUARY COVERED in spines, echidnas don't look especially cuddly, but in relaxed situations these Australian endemics feel incredibly soft.
'Some of the identified species were Black Palm Cockatoos, wallabies and Echidna,' the statement said.
Among them, watch out for the echidna, related to the platypus, that can lower its body temperature to endure icy winters.
They are also variously called Nakichi and Echidna. Salimah's skin, like Nakichi's, is as "sleek and glossy as fine tanned leather"; Sayuri's black hair is as "hard and straight as an echidna's [a spiny anteater] quills."
Ugandan Knuckles derives from the character (http://sega.wikia.com/wiki/Knuckles_the_Echidna) Knuckles The Echidna , which appeared in Sega's Sonic the Hedgehog 3 in 1994.
Keep your eyes peeled for the elusive echidna train, which involves one female echidna being pursued by up to 10 males.
The only mammals today that lay eggs are the four echidna species and the duckbilled platypus.
Echidna has launched its partnership program, Echidna Partner Alliance.