echoer


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ech·o

 (ĕk′ō)
n. pl. ech·oes
1.
a. Repetition of a sound by reflection of sound waves from a surface.
b. The sound produced in this manner.
2. A repetition or an imitation: a fashion that is an echo of an earlier style.
3. A remnant or vestige: found echoes of past civilizations while examining artifacts in the Middle East.
4. One who imitates another, as in opinions, speech, or dress.
5. A sympathetic response: Their demand for justice found an echo in communities across the nation.
6. A consequence or repercussion: Her resignation had echoes throughout the department.
7. Repetition of certain sounds or syllables in poetry, as in echo verse.
8. Music Soft repetition of a note or phrase.
9. Electronics A reflected wave received by a radio or radar.
10. An echocardiogram.
v. ech·oed, ech·o·ing, ech·oes
v.tr.
1. To repeat (a sound) by the reflection of sound waves from a surface.
2. To repeat or imitate: followers echoing the cries of their leader; events that echoed a previous incident in history.
v.intr.
1. To be repeated by or as if by an echo: The shout echoed off the wall. The speaker's words echoed in her mind.
2. To resound with or as if with an echo; reverberate: rooms echoing with laughter.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin ēchō, from Greek ēkhō.]

ech′o·er n.
ech′o·ey adj.
Synonyms: echo, reflect, resound, reverberate
These verbs mean to be repeated by the reflection of sound waves: a cry that echoed through the canyon; traffic noise reflecting off the buildings; a loud hammering that resounded through the tunnel; a final chord that reverberated in the concert hall.

Ech·o

 (ĕk′ō)
n. Greek Mythology
A nymph whose unrequited love for Narcissus caused her to pine away until only her voice remained.

echoer

(ˈɛkəʊə) or

echoist

n
a person who produces an echo
References in periodicals archive ?
Bethea adds, "Echo it wants to be the echoer and re-echoer's biggest supporter.
The leading discussion message was followed up by various responses from some identified as the direct dissenters, some echoers, some sympathizers with the American adopters, and some supporters of the Chinese biological parents.
The Fleming lectures have, of course, varied widely (even wildly) in style and substance," says Professor Noggle, who has heard many of the speakers: "lectures by generalists and particularists, storytellers and cliometricians, challenging revisionists of conventional wisdom and tiresome echoers of songs sung before" (p.