echolocation


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Related to echolocation: Human echolocation

ech·o·lo·ca·tion

 (ĕk′ō-lō-kā′shən)
n.
1. A sensory system in certain animals, such as bats and dolphins, in which usually high-pitched sounds are emitted and their echoes interpreted to determine the direction and distance of objects.
2. Electronics A process for determining the location of objects by emitting sound waves and analyzing the waves reflected back to the sender by the object. In both senses also called echo ranging.

ech′o·lo·cate′ (-lō-kāt′) v.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

echolocation

(ˌɛkəʊləʊˈkeɪʃən)
n
(General Engineering) determination of the position of an object by measuring the time taken for an echo to return from it and its direction
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ech•o•lo•ca•tion

(ˌɛk oʊ loʊˈkeɪ ʃən)

n.
1. a method of locating objects by determining the time for an echo to return and the direction from which it returns, as by radar or sonar.
2. the sonarlike system used by dolphins, bats, and other animals to detect objects by emitting usu. high-pitched sounds that reflect off the object and return to the ears or other sensory receptors.
[1944]
ech`o•lo′cate, v.t. -cat•ed, -cat•ing.
ech`o•lo′ca•tor, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

ech·o·lo·ca·tion

(ĕk′ō-lō-kā′shən)
1. A sensory system in certain animals, such as bats and dolphins, in which the animals send out high-pitched sounds and use their echoes to determine the position of objects. See Note at bat.
2. The use of reflected sound waves, as by radar or sonar, to determine the location and size of distant or underwater objects.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

echolocation

the fixing of the position of an object by transmitting a signal and measuring the time required for it to bounce back, typically done by radar or sonar and by bats.
See also: Sound
the fixing of the position of an object by transmitting a signal and measuring the time required for it to bounce back, typically done by radar or sonar.
See also: Distance
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.echolocation - determining the location of something by measuring the time it takes for an echo to return from it
localization, locating, localisation, location, fix - a determination of the place where something is; "he got a good fix on the target"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

echolocation

[ˌekəʊləʊˈkeɪʃən] Necolocación f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

echolocation

echo-location [ˌɛkəʊləʊˈkeɪʃən] nécholocation f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
WE recall with much mirth President Trump's echolocation tweet about meeting the Prince of Whales.
On the other hand, the structure of echolocation calls is a useful tool for classifying bats since is strongly related to bat feeding and flying (Neuwieler, 1983; Russo & Jones, 2002; Hintze, Barbier, & Bernard, 2016).
Furthermore, an important form of communication for whales is echolocation, and this can be disrupted in shallow waters.
We'll look for bats using a special "bat detector." The device uses echolocation to identify a bat's location by their reflected sounds.
Josefin Starkhammar discovered that the ultrasounds emitted by dolphins for echolocation actually consist of two slightly staggered signals that serve different purposes.
Elaine Belvis said such a whale could have made its way into Davao's waters because its echolocation was disturbed, or it may have chased fish into shallower water.
He is among the one percent of the crew who have not devolved into blind, zombie-like monsters that use sound as a weapon to kill humans and echolocation to move around the ship.
[USA], Sep 08 (ANI): Bats are well known for their echolocation - sending out sound waves and listening for their echo - to navigate through areas riddled with obstacles, but a study has recently revealed that this useful ability is hindered by smooth vertical surfaces like metal or glass windows on buildings.
They use the technique called echolocation. By using the echoes of the sound waves they produce, the bats can 'gauge' or 'see' the surroundings.
Key words: acoustic, bats, Brazilian Free-tailed Bat, British Columbia, Canada, echolocation, Salt Spring Island, Tadarida brasiliensis
Your blinded heroine, Cassandra, visualises her surroundings with echolocation, either by tapping her stick, or from the ambient noise of dripping taps, noisy plumbing or blaring radios.