echolocation


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Related to echolocation: Human echolocation

ech·o·lo·ca·tion

 (ĕk′ō-lō-kā′shən)
n.
1. A sensory system in certain animals, such as bats and dolphins, in which usually high-pitched sounds are emitted and their echoes interpreted to determine the direction and distance of objects.
2. Electronics A process for determining the location of objects by emitting sound waves and analyzing the waves reflected back to the sender by the object. In both senses also called echo ranging.

ech′o·lo·cate′ (-lō-kāt′) v.

echolocation

(ˌɛkəʊləʊˈkeɪʃən)
n
(General Engineering) determination of the position of an object by measuring the time taken for an echo to return from it and its direction

ech•o•lo•ca•tion

(ˌɛk oʊ loʊˈkeɪ ʃən)

n.
1. a method of locating objects by determining the time for an echo to return and the direction from which it returns, as by radar or sonar.
2. the sonarlike system used by dolphins, bats, and other animals to detect objects by emitting usu. high-pitched sounds that reflect off the object and return to the ears or other sensory receptors.
[1944]
ech`o•lo′cate, v.t. -cat•ed, -cat•ing.
ech`o•lo′ca•tor, n.

ech·o·lo·ca·tion

(ĕk′ō-lō-kā′shən)
1. A sensory system in certain animals, such as bats and dolphins, in which the animals send out high-pitched sounds and use their echoes to determine the position of objects. See Note at bat.
2. The use of reflected sound waves, as by radar or sonar, to determine the location and size of distant or underwater objects.

echolocation

the fixing of the position of an object by transmitting a signal and measuring the time required for it to bounce back, typically done by radar or sonar and by bats.
See also: Sound
the fixing of the position of an object by transmitting a signal and measuring the time required for it to bounce back, typically done by radar or sonar.
See also: Distance
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.echolocation - determining the location of something by measuring the time it takes for an echo to return from it
localization, locating, localisation, location, fix - a determination of the place where something is; "he got a good fix on the target"
Translations

echolocation

[ˌekəʊləʊˈkeɪʃən] Necolocación f

echolocation

echo-location [ˌɛkəʊləʊˈkeɪʃən] nécholocation f
References in periodicals archive ?
Tables 1 and 2 show that most previous studies of echolocation focused on the performance of persons who were blind, with training potential an implied motivation of the research.
The purpose of this field trip was to shoot high-definition video footage of the cave ecosystem, take macro-photographs of the bats, and digitally record their ultrasonic echolocation calls for the enhanced exhibit.
Allen's big-eared bat (Idionycteris phyllotis) is the only species in North America known to emit long, constant frequency-frequency modulated echolocation calls (Simmons and O'Farrell, 1977; Simmons and Stein, 1980).
Known as echolocation, it enables people with reduced visibility to use their own voices to recognise objects which could form barriers.
To fly in the dark bats use echolocation to create a picture of what's around them, including the insects they feed on - about 3,000 midges a night
Most bat species, however, use echolocation to do the same.
Scientists are studying bats and their use of echolocation to learn more about how bats process information to understand and adapt to the world around them.
They detect and catch their targets through echolocation, or biosonar, the animal equivalent--and precursor--to man-made sonars.
The echolocation call characteristics of many bats change in response to the habitats in which they forage [18, 19]; the acoustic characteristics of the calls of even well-studied species above canopy are unknown.
Healthy bats fly by echolocation, a sort of natural sonar, which helps them avoid contact with objects, including humans.
The AD7766 is designed for low-power equipment where small or faint signals must be distinguished in the presence of larger signals, including applications like echolocation, data acquisition and industrial vibration analysis.
An ultrasonic microphone detected the sound waves of the bats' echolocation chirps.