echolocation


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Related to echolocation: Human echolocation

ech·o·lo·ca·tion

 (ĕk′ō-lō-kā′shən)
n.
1. A sensory system in certain animals, such as bats and dolphins, in which usually high-pitched sounds are emitted and their echoes interpreted to determine the direction and distance of objects.
2. Electronics A process for determining the location of objects by emitting sound waves and analyzing the waves reflected back to the sender by the object. In both senses also called echo ranging.

ech′o·lo·cate′ (-lō-kāt′) v.

echolocation

(ˌɛkəʊləʊˈkeɪʃən)
n
(General Engineering) determination of the position of an object by measuring the time taken for an echo to return from it and its direction

ech•o•lo•ca•tion

(ˌɛk oʊ loʊˈkeɪ ʃən)

n.
1. a method of locating objects by determining the time for an echo to return and the direction from which it returns, as by radar or sonar.
2. the sonarlike system used by dolphins, bats, and other animals to detect objects by emitting usu. high-pitched sounds that reflect off the object and return to the ears or other sensory receptors.
[1944]
ech`o•lo′cate, v.t. -cat•ed, -cat•ing.
ech`o•lo′ca•tor, n.

ech·o·lo·ca·tion

(ĕk′ō-lō-kā′shən)
1. A sensory system in certain animals, such as bats and dolphins, in which the animals send out high-pitched sounds and use their echoes to determine the position of objects. See Note at bat.
2. The use of reflected sound waves, as by radar or sonar, to determine the location and size of distant or underwater objects.

echolocation

the fixing of the position of an object by transmitting a signal and measuring the time required for it to bounce back, typically done by radar or sonar and by bats.
See also: Sound
the fixing of the position of an object by transmitting a signal and measuring the time required for it to bounce back, typically done by radar or sonar.
See also: Distance
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.echolocation - determining the location of something by measuring the time it takes for an echo to return from it
localization, locating, localisation, location, fix - a determination of the place where something is; "he got a good fix on the target"
Translations

echolocation

[ˌekəʊləʊˈkeɪʃən] Necolocación f

echolocation

echo-location [ˌɛkəʊləʊˈkeɪʃən] nécholocation f
References in periodicals archive ?
Sidebars particularize essential details, including vocalization, echolocation, sanctuaries, and the birth of Makoa, a Pacific dolphin.
USA], Sep 08 (ANI): Bats are well known for their echolocation - sending out sound waves and listening for their echo - to navigate through areas riddled with obstacles, but a study has recently revealed that this useful ability is hindered by smooth vertical surfaces like metal or glass windows on buildings.
Scientists are trying to use the concept of human echolocation to help visually challenged people.
Key words: acoustic, bats, Brazilian Free-tailed Bat, British Columbia, Canada, echolocation, Salt Spring Island, Tadarida brasiliensis
Your blinded heroine, Cassandra, visualises her surroundings with echolocation, either by tapping her stick, or from the ambient noise of dripping taps, noisy plumbing or blaring radios.
Echolocation calls of emballonurid bats in a xerophilous savannah of the Colombian Caribbean
Featuring amazing ocean animals, "Ocean Adventures With Jax" invites children to swim through the beautifully illustrated pages and learn about the intriguing echolocation signals that help dolphins determine what something looks like and how far away it is.
uk USING chirps, smacks and clicks, bats communicate through echolocation at a frequency inaudible to our ears.
The sounds of echolocation among the resident bats, undetectable by human ear, have been gathered using specialist equipment, recorded alongside the sounds of falling water, moving rocks and the slow emergence of cavers entering the artist's workspace from deep within the network.
Echovenator already shows skull features associated with echolocation, although it perhaps couldn't have processed signals from echolocation as well as modern dolphins," said New York Institute of Technology paleontologist Morgan Churchill, lead author of the research published in the journal Current Biology.
This system of finding prey is called echolocation - locating things by their echoes.
The whale washed up on the shoreline because it lost its echolocation probably due to blast fishing, Monido told the Inquirer by phone.