eco-labelling

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eco-labelling

n
(Commerce) the practice or system of using eco-labels
Translations

eco-labelling

eco-labeling (US) [ˌiːkəʊˈleɪbəlɪŋ] Necoetiquetado m
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References in periodicals archive ?
Mission 1: Training in the Eco-label approach; Mission 2: Global eco-neighborhood strategy on the 26 development zones of the Planning Program for Development (PPA); Mission 3: Assistance to Eco-labeling for each development project.
In the second half of our paper, we introduce eco-labeling as a regulatory tool for the government.
Although in Macedonia the criteria for eco-labeling of eight groups of products (detergents for hand washing of dishes, soaps, hair shampoos, paints and varnishes, shoes, textile, furniture, toilet paper and for tourist accommodation, were adopted in 2015, thus far no environmental label has been designated
This Note considers the merits of state-backed eco-labeling schemes, the implications of the US-Tuna II report for the WTO's approach to nontrade interests, and potential accommodations within the current WTO framework for eco-labels.
The Project Officer of GIZ, Lalit Sharma, said that this eco-labeling of the hotels project is a part of the umbrella project of eco business by UNIDO.
The eco-labeling sector's evolution must include realistic expectations, favor labels founded on expert-approved standards and create market conditions that reward companies for compliance, writes Mark LaCroix.
According to the company, Lumson's policies, resource conservation and continuous improvement in environmental performance were found to be consistent with the stringent standards of Ecocert so as to obtain the eco-labeling certification on two lines of packaging: "Collection Slim" and the "Victoria Collection.
Based on a dynamic game framework, the paper shows that both eco-labeling and more general full information disclosure policies may not always result in pollution reduction.
Green Seal was developed in the late 1980s by a coalition of environmentalists as a sister to eco-labeling programs that were already in place in Germany and Canada.
Studies specific to eco-labeling indicate that most consumers prefer environmentally friendly products, and many consumers are willing to pay substantial premiums for such products (Nimon and Beghin 1999; Johnston et al.
But environmentalists want to use the WTO to implement their sustainable development agenda: global renewable energy targets, regulation based on the precautionary principle, a "sustainable consumption and production project," a worldwide eco-labeling scheme.