ecocatastrophe

Related to ecocatastrophe: unmaintained

ecocatastrophe

(ˌiːkəʊkəˈtæstrəfɪ)
n
(Environmental Science) a disaster caused by the behaviour of mankind that has great detrimental impact on the environment

ec•o•ca•tas•tro•phe

(ˌɛk oʊ kəˈtæs trə fi, ˌi koʊ-)

n.
a widespread disaster caused by detrimental changes in the environment.
[1965–70]
References in periodicals archive ?
While we might now read it as a work of pioneering ecocatastrophe, at the time it was representative of a subgenre of such works.
If our culture is such that humanity is on a path to a global ecocatastrophe, and people are not making the required effort to deal with this, or to even comprehend it, then our culture is fundamentally diseased.
Like William Faulkner in his fiction depicting the disastrous 1927 flood of the Mississippi River, Hemingway also foresees that industrial modernization will necessarily result in ecocatastrophe. In his ecological lament, Hemingway chooses to use memory and nostalgia to memorialize through art what has been lost to irresponsible environmental damage.
Indeed, world government as the only alternative to ecocatastrophe is an ongoing theme of the UN's environmental programs.
What would emerge from it?" This is a striking departure from the conventional view of the Anthropocene as an ecocatastrophe, a kind of mass extinction event.
It was workers' willingness to fight for the cessation of pollution on site that gave a Canadian Dimension author writing in 1973 the confidence to baptize trade unions as the "one organized social force" capable of "preventing ecocatastrophe." (81) It is this sense of their own power to protect the environment and health that motivated various Canadian unions to strike, bargain, or take other direct action to prevent pollution from 1965 to 1985.
Seeing that John amalgamates eschatology, prophetic visions, cosmology and apocalyptic events to transform the reader's or hearer's perception of reality, one can also surmise that the seer advances ecology and ecocatastrophe as an interlocutor of persuasion for similar purposes.
Adrian Ivakhiv suggests that, if they are "explicitly about ecocatastrophe and environmental hubris," works can "arguably become easy to refute, critique, or ignore," whereas in more successful pieces, crisis "remain[s] inassimilable, hovering uneasily at the edges of our awareness"; he suggests this is "the virtue of the 'unconscious'" manifesting itself unexpectedly (2008, 108).
The blues, Ruffin explains, privilege the disadvantaged, celebrate collective experience, and "[dwell] in reality no matter how stark" (142), among other qualities--all crucial to grappling with the onslaught of imminent global ecocatastrophe. With wide-ranging quotations from Cortez's searing work and nuanced interpretations of those citations, Ruffin underscores the complexity of the poet's ecovision: "Those who are in ecological crisis may find in Cortez's poetry artful acknowledgement and advocacy," she writes.
as a factor significantly influencing the mode of life or the course of development ecospecies: ecosystem: ecad: 3 ec- or eco- : ecological or environmental ecocatastrophe', at http://www.spellingbee.com/pre_suf_comb.pdf.
But capitalism has its solution to ecocatastrophe. It's called fascism and Kovel talks about how it could emerge, for example, over the issue of immigration as millions of people are forced to flee the disastrous conditions wrought by flooding, drought, forest fires and other consequences of runaway global warming.
The governments and industries who got us into this mess, who have denied or delayed action on the ecological crisis for decades, who refuse to take substantive action even now as the evidence of looming ecocatastrophe piles up, have neither the intelligence nor the integrity to be entrusted with control of the world's thermostat or with carrying out experiments that can leave the planet worse off than it already is ...